Zenon Wasyliw

Professor, History

Title

History in the News: Globalization and Human Rights

History in the News: Global Identities and the Search for Justice

HIST 10600

FALL 2018, Monday, Wednesday, Friday – 11:00-11:50

Ithaca College

Zenon V. Wasyliw

Professor, Department of History and

Coordinator, Social Studies Teacher Education                                                                                                                                                                     

Muller 427, 274-1587, wasyliw@ithaca.edu  

Office Hours – Tuesday 2:30-3:30; Wednesday 12:00-1:30; Thursday 3:00-4:00

by appointment other times and days

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw

Introduction

History in the News introduces the field of contemporary history through an examination of current events and issues and their relation to global historical developments. The course conceptualizes global history with a focus on the histories and application of globalization and human rights issues. These two major themes are applied in assessing historical world regional developments and thematic issues.

Context

History in the News presents the larger context of recent global history (contemporary history) and the related outcome of globalization and its challenges.  Identities emerge and transform in response to accommodating globalization and in reaction against globalization. Students will compare and contrast local, national, regional and global identities, values and responses by evaluating current events and their connections to historical developments influenced by the challenges of globalization. Students will also address transformative thematic identities that are more universal and go beyond national and/or regional identities, for example, gender issues, global cultures, the environment, and virtual identities created through social media networked technologies. The course places justice as a parallel thematic pillar. Students evaluate the diverse identities and themes through the overarching global conceptualization of human rights.  The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights serves as a barometer and guideline for students to assure they recognize the abuse of power and injustice in their study of identities.  They will recognize the significance of human rights in conjunction with the higher ideals of global social justice within the theme of power and justice. An additional component of the course involves evaluating current events through the lens of the previous century by reading, evaluating and applying Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

Student Learning Objectives

1. Define and conceptualize contemporary history following humanities perspectives

2. Identify and apply primary and secondary research and diagnostic sources

3. Identify and evaluate comparative global long-term and recent historical developments and their relation to present and future global developments and concerns.

4. Introduce and apply the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a paradigm for assessing historical and current events issues and developments

5. Assess events utilizing varied historical and contemporary sources. Compare and contrast the identities of global regions, cultures and perspectives with American/U.S. collective and individual identities through current news media sources

6. Appraise the status of global, regional, local and thematic human rights through the lens of power and justice as applied through the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, related international human rights monitoring groups and non-governmental organizations

7. Define and interpret the significance of civil society in encouraging civic agency related to issues of social justice through participation on a global, national and local scale

Readings

Required -

Andrew Clapham, Human Rights. A Very Short Introduction Second Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Timothy Snyder, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (Duggan Books, 2017) 

Manfred B. Steger, Globalization. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2013)

Reference the following sources –

Ithaca College Library Guide to sources - https://libguides.ithaca.edu/history_news

Current History http://www.currenthistory.com/ journal is accessed through the library database

Ultimate Guide to History Resources

http://www.wiseoldsayings.com/history-guide/

Country Profiles and History Timelines - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/country_profiles/default.stm

How to Self-Check the News and Get The Facts https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts

Media Literacy Project Look Sharp https://www.projectlooksharp.org/

Additional sources and links are found at the end of this syllabus

Background information, readings and primary sources will be provided as handouts and through Sakai documents/resources

 COURSE OUTLINE AND ASSIGNMENTS

WEEK ONE – 29 and 31 August

Course introduction and current events framework for Friday

Review and evaluate United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights -

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml#atop

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK TWO – Read handout from Contemporary History and the websites below related to The Global Village and the Global 1%

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/global-village.htm

http://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/pressreleases/2015-01-19/richest-1-will-own-more-all-rest-2016

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2015/01/20/oxfams-still-wrong-about-the-global-1-and-all-economic-growth-flowing-to-them/

https://news.vice.com/article/sixty-two-people-now-have-a-greater-net-worth-than-half-the-worlds-population

http://www.globalrichlist.com/  -

https://inequality.org/facts/income-inequality/

World Inequality Report - http://wir2018.wid.world/

Extreme poverty in America: read the UN special monitor's report

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=22533&LangID=E

The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/06/the-birth-of-a-new-american-aristocracy/559130/

Where the top 1% and the bottom 20% go to college

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/01/18/upshot/some-colleges-have-more-students-from-the-top-1-percent-than-the-bottom-60.html?_r=1

World Maps - http://geology.com/world/world-map.shtml

http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2016/11/03/most-accurate-world-map/#.WUnO200UWM-

Assignment of collaborative study groups

WEEK TWO – 5 and 7 September No class Labor Day – Sept. 3

Defining and conceptualizing contemporary history and its relation to current global events.

The Global Village and the Global 1% concepts of wealth, poverty and social class

Discussion of assigned readings

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK THREE - Chapters 1 and 2 in Globalization Chapters 1 and 2 in Human Rights

Globalization and Human Rights Teach-ins.  Students will select focused chapters (Globalization 3-8) (Human Rights 3-9) to create respective study groups. Each study group will then offer a presentation on their theme and develop questions for the rest of the class to draw comparative analyses.

Also Review for Week Three –

Imperialism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICHI2G0YgsU

The Story of Human Rights - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oh3BbLk5UIQ

Globalization - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oTLyPPrZE4

Gangnam Style

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0

Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRpeEdMmmQ0

Luis Fonsi - Despacito ft. Daddy Yankee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJQP7kiw5Fk

Forum – open topics

WEEK THREE – 10, 12, 14 September

Teach-in and discussion of Globalization and Human Rights chapters and thematic applications

http://www.globalization101.org/what-is-globalization/

https://www.hrw.org/

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK FOUR –

Social Justice and Identities- Class, Race, Gender, Ethnicity

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S64zRnnn4Po&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=40 Crash Course on United States History the Civil Rights Movement

Global, United States and Ithaca College perspectives

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/11/30/heres-what-students-really-think-about-race-on-campus.html?utm_campaign=americatonight&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/11/30/as-racial-tensions-on-campus-rise-ithaca-college-looks-for-a-way-forward.html  

http://eji.org/racial-justice Equal Justice Initiative

https://nmaahc.si.edu/ National Museum of African American History

Begin following all news using the following Canadian sources

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

http://nationalpost.com/

http://www.cbc.ca/news

http://globalnews.ca/

https://www.thestar.com/

WEEK FOUR – 17, 19, 21 September

Globalization and Human Rights Teach-in and concluding discussion

Social Justice and Identities reflections on Ithaca College, national and global diversity and inclusion

Introduction to Canada

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK FIVE – Sakai background reading on history of North America

The War of 1812 and Canadian Identity

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/war-of-1812/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVC677-YmfM

Canadian History

http://www.canadashistory.ca/

Canadian and U.S. governments compared

http://www.lop.parl.gc.ca/About/Parliament/senatoreugeneforsey/book/chapter_4-e.html

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Canadian Health Care

http://www.canadian-healthcare.org/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYOf6hXGx6M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TPr3h-UDA0

Global Health - http://www.who.int/en/

http://globalhealth.org/

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association http://www.asha.org/

Humanities Perspective Essay is due (Take-home)

WEEK FIVE – 24, 26, 28 September

The United States and Canada

An introduction to Canada – discussion and analysis of Canadian history, politics, society and culture

The War of 1812 and Canadian Identity

Global Health Care

Focus on comparative government and health care policies

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrA4V6YF6SA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0oYjcEYiIw

Assignment for NEXT 2 WEEKS, SIX AND SEVEN – Sakai background history on Asia

http://library.columbia.edu/locations/global/southasia.html  

http://asianhistory.tumblr.com/

Country profiles, geography and histories, organization of working study groups

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-16924512   

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/asia/   

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/asia.html   

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/australia/  

https://www.hrw.org/   

https://www.amnesty.org/en/  

General technology overviews and developments

https://www.technologyreview.com/lists/technologies/2017/  

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology/

Begin and continue through week seven discussion and analysis of events and issues related to Asia and special topic of technology –

Discussion of technology related readings and issues

The History of Technology in Japan and East Asia

http://easts.dukejournals.org/content/3/4/525.full  

China’s rise as a major contributor to science and technology

https://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/china/china-rising-science-technology-research-contributions  

Why India is the fastest growing tech hub in the world

https://www.techinasia.com/talk/insights-india-fastest-growing-technology-hub-world  

Technology Timeline

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXewcY6l_VA&index=4&list=PLlKvW_P7lrq5-7ibyj8H8jz9fIZhihalB   

History of Social Networking

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/the-history-of-social-networking/

WEEKS SIX AND SEVEN – 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12 October

Asia Study group presentations and discussions of regional, and global comparisons and assessments

Asia and the world - Technology, social networking and the future of globalization and human rights

Assignment for NEXT TWO WEEKS, WEEKS EIGHT AND NINE  – Sakai background history and

European Union history - http://globaledge.msu.edu/trade-blocs/european-union/history  

European Union website - http://europa.eu/  

Council of Europe - http://www.coe.int/en/       

Fall of Communism in Eastern and Central Europe - http://chnm.gmu.edu/1989/

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Read Snyder, On Tyranny, finish book for week nine to discuss on 22 October

European newspapers in English –

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/european%20newspapers%20in%20english.html#.VZK77k3JCM8  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/europe/   

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk/

Paris Agreement, climate change and the environment

http://unfccc.int/files/essential_background/convention/application/pdf/english_paris_agreement.pdf

http://unfccc.int/paris_agreement/items/9485.php

European Union on Environmental issues http://europa.eu/european-union/topics/environment_en

Environmental History

http://environmentalhistory.net/

The Environment and Human Rights

https://www.hrw.org/topic/environment?ea.tracking.id=ED2017EVSCgg&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxaHIlcTW2AIV1oWzCh2i7gqCEAAYASAAEgKg3_D_BwE

WEEKS EIGHT AND NINE 15 and 17 October; No class on 19 October Fall Break, 22, 24, and 26 October

Europe – the European Union, the Council of Europe and Europe during and after the Cold War era

Discussion of European Union and Council of Europe goals with a focus on environmental issues

General discussion on global environmental issues and connections to human rights

Introduction to and discussion of upcoming Special Project

Discussion of Snyder, On Tyranny 22 October

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK TEN – Sakai background history on Africa and following sites

African History - http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/index.shtml

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/Country.html  

Africa Check: Sorting Fact from Fiction

https://africacheck.org/

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

African regional groups

African Newspapers in English –

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/african%20newspapers%20in%20english.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/africa/  

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/africa.html

Migration and refugees in Africa

http://www.unhcr.org/en-us/africa.html

http://africasacountry.com/2016/10/the-majority-of-africans-migrants-refugees-between-countries-on-the-continent/

Global migration and migrants’ rights

http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/theme/international-migration/  

http://www.migrant-rights.org/news-reports/

Conceptualize and prepare Special Project Proposal –

WEEK TEN – 29, 31 October and 2 November

Analysis of history, events and issues related to Africa

Regional reports and discussion of African and global migration and refugees

Discussion and organization of Special Projects

Special Project Proposal is due

Assignment for WEEK ELEVEN AND TWELVE – Sakai background history on Middle Eastern history

Middle East - Southwest Asia. Also -

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/indiv/mideast/cuvlm/Iran.html   

http://www.mei.edu

Middle East – History, Geography and Current Events –

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/middleeast.html  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/middle_east/  

http://america.aljazeera.com/   

http://www.jpost.com/   

http://www.tehrantimes.com/

Special theme - Gender and role of women in the Middle East

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/globalconnections/mideast/questions/women/

Global and United States gender relations history and issues

http://www.unwomen.org/en

http://www.wikigender.org/wiki/history-of-the-movement-for-gender-equality/

Women’s rights - https://www.hrw.org/topic/womens-rights

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

LGBT rights - https://www.hrw.org/topic/lgbt-rights

WEEK ELEVEN – 8, 10, and 12 November

Discussion and analysis of events and issues related to the Middle East

Regional reports and current events analysis

WEEK TWELVE – 15, 17, 19 November

Discussion of gender rights and LGBT rights

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK THIRTEEN

Contemporary history of Latin and South America and

http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/LA/intro.html  

http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/svolk/latinam.htm  

https://www.hrw.org/   

https://www.amnesty.org/en/  

Country and regional report groups organized

Latin American Revolutions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBw35Ze3bg8&t=160s  

Global Sport and Human Rights

http://www.sportandhumanrights.org/wordpress/  

“Football in Latin America – Origins, Culture and Globalization”

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Football_in_Latin_America_Origins_Cultur.pdf  

The Official 2014 FIFA World Cup Song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGtWWb9emYI  

The Other Side of Brazil's World Cup

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdUuae1xR5o  

Transparency International - Sport

https://www.transparency.org/topic/detail/sport/  

Thematic Current Event Analysis Take-home paper is due

THANKSGIVING BREAK 17-25 November

WEEK THIRTEEN – 26, 28 30 November

Latin and South America – country/regional reports and discussion

http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/LA/intro.html  

Latin and South American newspapers in English

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/english%20newspapers%20of%20south%20american.htm  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/latin_america/

Football in Latin and South America, discussion of handout

Global Sport and Human Rights

Humanities Perspective Essay is due 8 March

WEEKS FOURTEEN AND FIFTEEN – 3-14 December

Completion of Latin America and Global Sports

SPECIAL PROJECT PRESENTATIONS AND COURSE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

FINALS WEEKComplete Special Project Presentations Tuesday 18 December 4:30-7:00

Take-home exam due Thursday, 20 December at noon,

Requirements

1. Attendance “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.  At the beginning of each semester, instructors must provide the students in their courses with written guidelines regarding possible grading penalties for failure to attend class. Students should notify their instructors as soon as possible of any anticipated absences. Written documentation that indicates the reason for being absent may be required. These guidelines may vary from course to course but are subject to the following restrictions:” Please carefully read the official Ithaca College attendance policy for detailed elaborations upon “1. In accordance with New York State law, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs shall be excused from class or examinations on that day. 2. Any student who misses class due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency, or to a required appearance in a court of law, shall be excused. 3. A student may be excused for participation in College-authorized co-curricular and extracurricular activities, if, in the instructor's judgment, this does not impair the specific student's or the other students' ability to succeed in the course. http://www.ithaca.edu/hs/depts/theatre/handbook/academics/attendance/    

2. There are three required paperback books for the course - Andrew Clapham, Human Rights. A Very Short Introduction Second Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Timothy Snyder, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (Duggan Books, 2017)

Manfred B. Steger, Globalization. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2013)

3. On-line library sources - The course utilizes sources made available through the Ithaca College library on the site prepared by the college archivist and librarian Ms. Bridget Bower - https://ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/guide.php?subject=history_news  

a. The journals Current History, Foreign Affairs, Journal of Contemporary History and World History Connected serve as contextual and analytical sources for the course. The journals are available through the Ithaca College database and accessed through the above link. I will assign appropriate journal articles related to developing news stories and events

b. The Ithaca College site also allows access to world newspapers in English. Specific links are found in the Course Outline and Assignments section of this syllabus.

4. Additional sources, updates and announcements are found on Sakai.

5. Humanities perspective essay explores human expressions and arguments on values, beliefs and behaviors of self and others. This is a take-home assignment drawing on a global theme.

6.  Current Event Analysis makes connections to either the identities or power and justice theme. This is a take-home assignment that adheres to the following format -

a.) reference source, major questions

b.) historical context and comparison with US perspectives 

c.) connections to either the identities or power and justice theme as defined in the student learning objectives

d.) a conclusive analysis with predications and/or solutions

7. Final Assessment, a take-home essay assignment due on exam week, applies primary sources through a selected thematic and historical analytical approach that is global, national, local and personal.

8. Special Project - The project must be on a subject of intense personal interest or life influence related to our class focus “History in the News: Global Identities and the Search for Justice.”  Creative, non-conformist topics are encouraged as are more standard topics or topics related to one’s future profession or plans. Collaborative projects are encouraged. You may work in pairs or larger groups, yet individual projects are also fine. Projects will be shared in class several weeks after the spring break. Topics must be reviewed and approved by the instructor.

Format –

1. A one or two paragraph introduction that includes a brief overview of the topic, why the topic was selected and a thesis statement that answers a larger question or questions and its relation to the course.

2. The actual presentation may take the form of:

a.) a 15 minute group presentation with outline handouts for the class

b.) a video presentation prepared for the class, also with outline handouts

c.) a poster presentation

d.) a three to five page cited essay with a brief summary provided for the class

e.) a speculative futurist scenario through role playing and/or media

f.) other formats will also be considered

9. Friday ForumsFriday classes are set aside for open discussions and analysis of events and topics brought forth by students posting news articles related to the week’s themes. We will establish a closed class Facebook group page to facilitate our Friday Forums.

10.  Groups will be created for closer assessments of regional and thematic topics and to enhance class discussions.

11.  The writing of essays, critiques and papers follows specific criteria and all sources must be properly documented.  Carefully read the Ithaca College Standards of Academic Conduct found at the end of the syllabus and at the following Student Policies link –

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/general/070104/  

Documentation needs to follow the Chicago Manual of Style -

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html  

Additional citation styles -  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/

12.   "In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodations will be provided to qualified students with documented disabilities. Students seeking accommodations must register with Student Accessibility Services and provide appropriate documentation before any accommodations can be provided. Please note that accommodations are not retroactive so timely contact with Student Accessibility Services is encouraged."

13. Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me. However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance.

Ithaca College provides no-additional-cost mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them. It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, ICare, Health Center, Chaplains, etc...), if needed, is available.

Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones

14. Title IX is a federal act mandating that educational institutions receiving federal funding must provide sex and gender equity. All students thus have the right to a campus atmosphere free of sexual harassment, sexual violence, and gender discrimination. For reports of sexual assault and general issues, please contact Tiffani Ziemann, Title IX Coordinator

https://www.ithaca.edu/sacl/share/

15. Student Wellness at Ithaca College - https://www.ithaca.edu/sacl/healthpromotion/

16. The syllabus outline, topics and assignments dates are subject to change due to coverage of unforeseen major news developments.

Assessments

Humanities Perspective Essay                                              20%

Thematic Current Event Analysis                                         20%

Special Project                                                                      20%

Final Assessment                                                                  20%

Attendance, participation, collaboration, Friday Forums

News group summaries                                                        20%

                                                                                            100%

.

Additional reference sources

William J Duiker, Contemporary World History (Wadsworth, 2014)

Frank J. Lechner (Editor), John Boli (Editor), The Globalization Reader (Wiley-Blackwell, December 2014)

The Human Rights Reader: Major Political Essays, Speeches and Documents From Ancient Times to the Present 2nd Edition

Sources and assignments will be posted weekly on Sakai depending on developments in the news

Additional sources accessed through our library database -

Current History http://www.currenthistory.com/   Journal of Contemporary World Affairs and Foreign Affairs https://www.foreignaffairs.com/

https://www.newsy.com/categories/foreignpolicy/   Newsy Foreign Policy

http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/index.html documents to support the study of world history from a working-class and non-Eurocentric perspective.

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/  

http://worldhistorymatters.org/

http://www.bbc.com/   

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/  

http://www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/  

http://www.worldpress.org/gateway.htm  

http://www.hrw.org/  

http://www.amnesty.org/   

http://www.dw.com/en/tv/global-3000/s-11487  

The Writing Center aims to help students from all disciplines, backgrounds, and experiences to develop greater independence as writers.  We are committed to helping students see writing as central to critical and creative thinking. 

In a friendly, comfortable atmosphere, writers at all levels participate in one-on-one conferences with advanced student and faculty tutors to work on effective strategies for all aspects of the writing process. Topics explored in these conferences may include

  1. idea generation, focus, and organization
  2. understanding of assignments and readings
  3. comprehensive rewriting of drafts
  4. sentence structure and style
  5. grammar, punctuation, and spelling
  6. research and note-taking methods
  7. source documentation

The Writing Center offers these services for students in all disciplines: humanities and sciences, business, health sciences and human performance, communications, and music. In our conferences, we encourage students to develop confidence as independent thinkers and writers. This means that we will not revise or correct papers for students, but instead will help them learn how to do so for themselves.

The Writing Center is open M-F 9-5 and Sn-Tr 7-10 (PM). Please make an appointment! If we are booked, you can sign up for the waiting list.

Appointments can be made by visiting http://ithaca.mywconline.com

Conceptual Frameworks

History in the News is a humanities course that seeks to understand the human experience through analysis, interpretation, and reflection, engaging in the particulars of individual experiences, texts, or other artifacts.

Humanities Perspective (HM)

1.      Understand and analyze human expression (such as language, texts, or images) through the lens of the humanities;

2.      Recognize and begin to appraise existing arguments and articulate arguments of your own;

3.      Describe and interpret the values, beliefs, and behaviors of yourself and others in the context of historical and/or contemporary cultural institutions.

This course has been approved by IC’s Committee for College-Wide Requirements for meeting the qualifications of the Integrative Core Curriculum.  Contingent upon successful completion of all course requirements and the uploading of required learning outcome artifacts onto Taskstream (indicated elsewhere on this syllabus), this class meets and satisfies the ICC identities, power and justice and humanities perspective designation.

Rubrics that are currently being used to assess ICC learning outcomes are available here, http://www.ithaca.edu/icc/docs/iccrubrics/   , and ICC data and assessment is available here, https://www.ithaca.edu/icc/facstaff/protected/iccassessment/   

We will describe and interpret the values, beliefs, and behaviors of self and others in the context of historical and contemporary cultural institutions through the study and analysis of global identities in comparison with United States identities. Human rights abuses serve as an interpretive paradigm in global issues of power and justice through historical interpretations of current events with an interpretive and critical analysis of human rights statuses based upon the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

History in the News follows historical and contemporary political, cultural and social interpretations of current global and national current events with an eye toward anticipating future trends and developments. This perspective is especially relevant in the latter half of the course when examining larger social science related themes of technology, health, the environment, sports and social and gender rights protected in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Power and Justice asks how both power and justice are related and how they can be balanced.  History in the News aligns with this theme through an examination of power structures and issues of justice that are deeply connected to both conflict and resolution through a study of global identities, social issues and larger interdisciplinary themes. History in the News identifies and evaluates the historical and contemporary relationship between power and justice distributed, transformed and mobilized through a variety of global developments seeking justice and social and cultural transformation. Special focus is given to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and reports of Human Rights watch groups. Two three page analytical evaluative reports serve as artifacts in student assessment of meeting the power and Justice learning objective.

History in the News addresses the theme of identities through a comparison and contrast of identities of global regions, cultures and perspectives with our own American/U.S. collective and individual identities and perspectives. These identities are assessed through an evaluation of current events utilizing varied historical contexts and interpretations through scholarly publications and current news media sources.  Two three page analytic evaluative reports serve as artifacts in student assessments of meeting the identities learning objective

History in the News: Global Identities and the Search for Justice

HIST 10600, CRN 42797

SPRING 2018, Tuesday and Thursday 9:25-10:40

Ithaca College

Zenon V. Wasyliw

Professor, Department of History and

Coordinator, Social Studies Teacher Education                                                                                                                                                                     

Muller 427, 274-1587, wasyliw@ithaca.edu  

Office Hours – Tuesday 11:00-12:00; Thursday 2:30-3:30; Monday and Wednesday 1:00-2:00; by appointment other times and days

https://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw

Introduction

History in the News introduces the field of contemporary history through an examination of current events and issues and their relation to global historical developments. The course conceptualizes global history with a focus on the histories and application of globalization and human rights issues. These two major themes are applied in assessing historical world regional developments and thematic issues.

Context

History in the News presents the larger context of recent global history (contemporary history) and the related outcome of globalization and its challenges.  Identities emerge and transform in response to accommodating globalization and in reaction against globalization. Students will compare and contrast local, national, regional and global identities, values and responses by evaluating current events and their connections to historical developments influenced by the challenges of globalization. Students will also address transformative thematic identities that are more universal and go beyond national and/or regional identities, for example, gender issues, global cultures, the environment, and virtual identities created through social media networked technologies. The course places justice as a parallel thematic pillar. Students evaluate the diverse identities and themes through the overarching global conceptualization of human rights.  The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights serves as a barometer and guideline for students to assure they recognize the abuse of power and injustice in their study of identities.  They will recognize the significance of human rights in conjunction with the higher ideals of global social justice within the theme of power and justice. An additional component of the course involves evaluating current events through the lens of the previous century by reading, evaluating and applying Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

Student Learning Objectives

1. Define and conceptualize contemporary history following humanities perspectives

2. Identify and apply primary and secondary research and diagnostic sources

3. Identify and evaluate comparative global long-term and recent historical developments and their relation to present and future global developments and concerns.

4. Introduce and apply the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a paradigm for assessing historical and current events issues and developments

5. Assess events utilizing varied historical and contemporary sources. Compare and contrast the identities of global regions, cultures and perspectives with American/U.S. collective and individual identities through current news media sources

6. Appraise the status of global, regional, local and thematic human rights through the lens of power and justice as applied through the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, related international human rights monitoring groups and non-governmental organizations

7. Define and interpret the significance of civil society in encouraging civic agency related to issues of social justice through participation on a global, national and local scale

Readings

Required -

Andrew Clapham, Human Rights. A Very Short Introduction Second Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Timothy Snyder, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (Duggan Books, 2017)

Manfred B. Steger, Globalization. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2013)

Ultimate Guide to History Resources

http://www.wiseoldsayings.com/history-guide/

Country Profiles and History Timelines - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/country_profiles/default.stm

How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts

Media Literacy Project Look Sharp https://www.projectlooksharp.org/

Additional sources and links are found at the end of this syllabus

Background information, readings and primary sources will be provided as handouts and through Sakai documents/resources

COURSE OUTLINE AND ASSIGNMENTS

WEEK ONE – 23 and 25 January

Course introduction and current events framework for Thursday

Review United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights -

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml#atop

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK TWO – Read handout from Contemporary History and the websites below related to The Global Village and the Global 1%

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/global-village.htm

http://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/pressreleases/2015-01-19/richest-1-will-own-more-all-rest-2016

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2015/01/20/oxfams-still-wrong-about-the-global-1-and-all-economic-growth-flowing-to-them/

https://news.vice.com/article/sixty-two-people-now-have-a-greater-net-worth-than-half-the-worlds-population

http://www.globalrichlist.com/  -

https://inequality.org/facts/income-inequality/

World Inequality Report - http://wir2018.wid.world/

Extreme poverty in America: read the UN special monitor's report

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=22533&LangID=E

Where the top 1% and the bottom 20% go to college

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/01/18/upshot/some-colleges-have-more-students-from-the-top-1-percent-than-the-bottom-60.html?_r=1

http://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/206468/happiest-unhappiest-countries-world.aspx

World Maps - http://geology.com/world/world-map.shtml

http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2016/11/03/most-accurate-world-map/#.WUnO200UWM-

Assignment of collaborative study groups

WEEK TWO – 30 January and 1 February

Defining and conceptualizing contemporary history and its relation to current global events.

The Global Village and the Global 1% concepts of wealth, poverty and social class

Discussion of assigned readings

Read and prepare for NEXT WEEK, WEEK THREE - Chapters 1 and 2 in Globalization Chapters 1 and 2 in Human Rights

Globalization and Human Rights Teach-ins.  Students will select one of the focused chapters (Globalization 3-8) (Human Rights 3-9) to create respective study group. Each study group will then offer a presentation on their theme and develop questions for the rest of the class

Also Review for Week Three –

Imperialism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICHI2G0YgsU

The Story of Human Rights - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oh3BbLk5UIQ

Globalization - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oTLyPPrZE4

Gangnam Style

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0

Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRpeEdMmmQ0

Luis Fonsi - Despacito ft. Daddy Yankee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJQP7kiw5Fk

Forum – open topics

WEEK THREE – 6 and 8 February

Teach-in and discussion of Globalization and Human Rights chapters and thematic applications

http://www.globalization101.org/what-is-globalization/

https://www.hrw.org/

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Assignment for NEXT WEEK, WEEK FOUR –

Social Justice and Identities- Class, Race, Gender, Ethnicity

Global, United States and Ithaca College perspectives

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/11/30/heres-what-students-really-think-about-race-on-campus.html?utm_campaign=americatonight&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/11/30/as-racial-tensions-on-campus-rise-ithaca-college-looks-for-a-way-forward.html

http://eji.org/racial-justice

Read Snyder, On Tyranny, Prologue and chapters 1-3

Begin following all news using the following Canadian sources

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

http://nationalpost.com/

http://www.cbc.ca/news

http://globalnews.ca/

https://www.thestar.com/

WEEK FOUR – 13 and 15 February

Globalization and Human Rights Teach-in and concluding discussion

Social Justice and Identities reflections on Ithaca College, national and global diversity and inclusion

Discussion of Snyder, On Tyranny

Introduction to Canada

Read for NEXT WEEK, WEEK FIVE – Sakai background reading on history of North America

The War of 1812 and Canadian Identity

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/war-of-1812/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVC677-YmfM

Canadian History

http://www.canadashistory.ca/

Canadian and U.S. governments compared

http://www.lop.parl.gc.ca/About/Parliament/senatoreugeneforsey/book/chapter_4-e.html

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Canadian Health Care

http://www.canadian-healthcare.org/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYOf6hXGx6M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TPr3h-UDA0

Global Health - http://www.who.int/en/

http://globalhealth.org/

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association http://www.asha.org/

Read Snyder, On Tyranny, chapters 4-6

WEEK FIVE – 20 and 22 February

The United States and Canada

An introduction to Canada – discussion and analysis of Canadian history, politics, society and culture

The War of 1812 and Canadian Identity

Global Health Care

Focus on comparative government and health care policies

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrA4V6YF6SA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0oYjcEYiIw

Discuss Snyder, On Tyranny through chapter 6

Read for NEXT WEEK, WEEK SIX – Sakai on contemporary history of Latin and South America and

http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/LA/intro.html

http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/svolk/latinam.htm

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Country and regional report groups organized

Latin American Revolutions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBw35Ze3bg8&t=160s

Global Sport and Human Rights

http://www.sportandhumanrights.org/wordpress/

“Football in Latin America – Origins, Culture and Globalization”

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Football_in_Latin_America_Origins_Cultur.pdf

The Official 2014 FIFA World Cup Song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGtWWb9emYI

The Other Side of Brazil's World Cup

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdUuae1xR5o

Transparency International - Sport

https://www.transparency.org/topic/detail/sport/

WEEK SIX – 27 February and 1 March

Latin and South America – country/regional reports and discussion

http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/LA/intro.html

Latin and South American newspapers in English

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/english%20newspapers%20of%20south%20american.htm

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/latin_america/

Football in Latin and South America, discussion of handout

Global Sport and Human Rights

Humanities Perspective Essay is due 8 March

Read for WEEK SEVEN – Sakai background history and

European Union history - http://globaledge.msu.edu/trade-blocs/european-union/history  

European Union website - http://europa.eu/  

Council of Europe - http://www.coe.int/en/       

Fall of Communism in Eastern and Central Europe - http://chnm.gmu.edu/1989/

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

Read Snyder, On Tyranny, finish book for week seven

European newspapers in English –

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/european%20newspapers%20in%20english.html#.VZK77k3JCM8  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/europe/   

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk/

Paris Agreement, climate change and the environment

http://unfccc.int/files/essential_background/convention/application/pdf/english_paris_agreement.pdf

http://unfccc.int/paris_agreement/items/9485.php

European Union on Environmental issues http://europa.eu/european-union/topics/environment_en

Environmental History

http://environmentalhistory.net/

The Environment and Human Rights

https://www.hrw.org/topic/environment?ea.tracking.id=ED2017EVSCgg&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxaHIlcTW2AIV1oWzCh2i7gqCEAAYASAAEgKg3_D_BwE

WEEK SEVEN 6 and 8 March and WEEK EIGHT 20 and 22 March

SPRING BREAK 12-16 March

Europe – the European Union, the Council of Europe and Europe during and after the Cold War era

Discussion of European Union and Council of Europe goals with a focus on environmental issues

General discussion on global environmental issues and connections to human rights

Introduction to and discussion of upcoming Special Project

Discussion of Snyder, On Tyranny

Read for NEXT WEEK, WEEK NINE – Sakai background history on Africa and following sites

African History - http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/index.shtml

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/Country.html  

Africa Check: Sorting Fact from Fiction

https://africacheck.org/

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

African regional groups

African Newspapers in English –

http://www.thebigproject.co.uk/news/african%20newspapers%20in%20english.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/africa/  

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/africa.html

Migration and refugees in Africa

http://www.unhcr.org/en-us/africa.html

http://africasacountry.com/2016/10/the-majority-of-africans-migrants-refugees-between-countries-on-the-continent/

Global migration and migrants’ rights

http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/theme/international-migration/  

http://www.migrant-rights.org/news-reports/

Conceptualize and prepare Special Project Proposal –

WEEK NINE – 27 and 29 March

Analysis of history, events and issues related to Africa

Regional reports and discussion of African and global migration and refugees

Discussion and organization of Special Projects

Special Project Proposal is due 3 April

Read for NEXT WEEK, WEEK TEN – Sakai background history on Middle Eastern history

Middle East - Southwest Asia. Also -

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/indiv/mideast/cuvlm/Iran.html   

http://www.mei.edu

Middle East – History, Geography and Current Events –

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/middleeast.html  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/middle_east/  

http://america.aljazeera.com/   

http://www.jpost.com/   

http://www.tehrantimes.com/

Special theme - Gender and role of women in the Middle East

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/globalconnections/mideast/questions/women/

Global and United States gender relations history and issues

http://www.unwomen.org/en

http://www.wikigender.org/wiki/history-of-the-movement-for-gender-equality/

Women’s rights - https://www.hrw.org/topic/womens-rights

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

LGBT rights - https://www.hrw.org/topic/lgbt-rights

WEEK TEN – 3 and 5 April

Discussion and analysis of events and issues related to the Middle East

Regional reports and current events analysis

Discussion of gender rights and LGBT rights

Read for NEXT 2 WEEKS, ELEVEN and TWELVE – Sakai background history on Asia

http://library.columbia.edu/locations/global/southasia.html

http://asianhistory.tumblr.com/

Country profiles, geography and histories, organization of working study groups

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-16924512  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/asia/  

http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/asia.html  

http://www.bbc.com/news/world/australia/

https://www.hrw.org/  

https://www.amnesty.org/en/

General technology overviews and developments

https://www.technologyreview.com/lists/technologies/2017/

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology/

Thematic Current Event Analysis Take-home paper – due 17 November

WEEK ELEVEN and TWELVE – 10, 12, 17, 19 April

Continue discussion on gender identities, rights and issues

Begin and continue through week twelve discussion and analysis of events and issues related to Asia and special topic of technology

Discussion of technology related readings and issues

The History of Technology in Japan and East Asia

http://easts.dukejournals.org/content/3/4/525.full

China’s rise as a major contributor to science and technology

https://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/china/china-rising-science-technology-research-contributions

Why India is the fastest growing tech hub in the world

https://www.techinasia.com/talk/insights-india-fastest-growing-technology-hub-world

Technology Timeline

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXewcY6l_VA&index=4&list=PLlKvW_P7lrq5-7ibyj8H8jz9fIZhihalB  

History of Social Networking

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/the-history-of-social-networking/

WEEK THIRTEEN and FOURTEEN – 24, 26 April 1, 3 May

SPECIAL PROJECT PRESENTATIONS AND COURSE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

WEEKS FIFTEEN–

FINALS WEEK – Class meeting Monday 7 May 4:30-7:00

Take-home exam due Wednesday 9 May at noon,

Requirements

1. Attendance “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.  At the beginning of each semester, instructors must provide the students in their courses with written guidelines regarding possible grading penalties for failure to attend class. Students should notify their instructors as soon as possible of any anticipated absences. Written documentation that indicates the reason for being absent may be required. These guidelines may vary from course to course but are subject to the following restrictions:” Please carefully read the official Ithaca College attendance policy for detailed elaborations upon “1. In accordance with New York State law, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs shall be excused from class or examinations on that day. 2. Any student who misses class due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency, or to a required appearance in a court of law, shall be excused. 3. A student may be excused for participation in College-authorized co-curricular and extracurricular activities, if, in the instructor's judgment, this does not impair the specific student's or the other students' ability to succeed in the course. https://www.ithaca.edu/hs/depts/theatre/handbook/academics/attendance/    

2. There are three required paperback books for the course - Andrew Clapham, Human Rights. A Very Short Introduction Second Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Timothy Snyder, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (Duggan Books, 2017)

Manfred B. Steger, Globalization. A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2013)

3. On-line library sources - The course utilizes sources made available through the Ithaca College library on the site prepared by the college archivist and librarian Ms. Bridget Bower - https://ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/guide.php?subject=history_news  

a. The journals Current History, Foreign Affairs, Journal of Contemporary History and World History Connected serve as contextual and analytical sources for the course. The journals are available through the Ithaca College database and accessed through the above link. I will assign appropriate journal articles related to developing news stories and events

b. The Ithaca College site also allows access to world newspapers in English. Specific links are found in the Course Outline and Assignments section of this syllabus.

4. Additional sources, updates and announcements are found on Sakai.

5. Humanities perspective essay explores human expressions and arguments on values, beliefs and behaviors of self and others. This is a take-home assignment drawing on a global theme.

6.  Current Event Analysis makes connections to either the identities or power and justice theme. This is a take-home assignment that adheres to the following format -

a.) reference source, major questions

b.) historical context and comparison with US perspectives 

c.) connections to either the identities or power and justice theme as defined in the student learning objectives

d.) a conclusive analysis with predications and/or solutions

7. Final Assessment, a take-home essay assignment due on exam week, applies primary sources through a selected thematic and historical analytical approach that is global, national, local and personal.

8. Special Project - The project must be on a subject of intense personal interest or life influence related to our class focus “History in the News: Global Identities and the Search for Justice.”  Creative, non-conformist topics are encouraged as are more standard topics or topics related to one’s future profession or plans. Collaborative projects are encouraged. You may work in pairs or larger groups, yet individual projects are also fine. Projects will be shared in class several weeks after the spring break. Topics must be reviewed and approved by the instructor.

Format –

1. A one or two paragraph introduction that includes a brief overview of the topic, why the topic was selected and a thesis statement that answers a larger question or questions and its relation to the course.

2. The actual presentation may take the form of:

a.) a 15 minute group presentation with outline handouts for the class

b.) a video presentation prepared for the class, also with outline handouts

c.) a poster presentation

d.) a three to five page cited essay with a brief summary provided for the class

e.) a speculative futurist scenario through role playing and/or media

f.) other formats will also be considered

9. Thursday Forums – the second half of Thursday classes are set aside for open discussions and analysis of events and topics brought forth by students posting news articles related to the week’s themes. We will establish a closed class Facebook group page to facilitate our Thursday Forums.

10.  Groups will be created for closer assessments of regional and thematic topics and to enhance class discussions.

11.  The writing of essays, critiques and papers follows specific criteria and all sources must be properly documented.  Carefully read the Ithaca College Standards of Academic Conduct found at the end of the syllabus and at the following Student Policies link –

https://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/general/070104/  

Documentation needs to follow the Chicago Manual of Style -

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html  

Additional citation styles -  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/

12.   "In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodations will be provided to qualified students with documented disabilities. Students seeking accommodations must register with Student Accessibility Services and provide appropriate documentation before any accommodations can be provided. Please note that accommodations are not retroactive so timely contact with Student Accessibility Services is encouraged."

13. Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me. However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance.

Ithaca College provides no-additional-cost mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them. It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, ICare, Health Center, Chaplains, etc...), if needed, is available.

Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones

14. Title IX is a federal act mandating that educational institutions receiving federal funding must provide sex and gender equity. All students thus have the right to a campus atmosphere free of sexual harassment, sexual violence, and gender discrimination. For reports of sexual assault and general issues, please contact Tiffani Ziemann, Title IX Coordinator

https://www.ithaca.edu/sacl/share/

15. The syllabus outline, topics and assignments dates are subject to change due to coverage of unforeseen major news developments.

Assessments

Humanities Perspective Essay                                              20%

Thematic Current Event Analysis                                         20%

Special Project                                                                      20%

Final Assessment                                                                  20%

Attendance, participation, collaboration, Thursday Forums

News group summaries                                                        20%

                                                                                            100%

Conceptual Frameworks

History in the News is a humanities course that seeks to understand the human experience through analysis, interpretation, and reflection, engaging in the particulars of individual experiences, texts, or other artifacts.

Humanities Perspective (HM)

1.      Understand and analyze human expression (such as language, texts, or images) through the lens of the humanities;

2.      Recognize and begin to appraise existing arguments and articulate arguments of your own; and

3.      Describe and interpret the values, beliefs, and behaviors of yourself and others in the context of historical and/or contemporary cultural institutions.

This course has been approved by IC’s Committee for College-Wide Requirements for meeting the qualifications of the Integrative Core Curriculum.  Contingent upon successful completion of all course requirements and the uploading of required learning outcome artifacts onto Taskstream (indicated elsewhere on this syllabus), this class meets and satisfies the ICC identities, power and justice and humanities perspective designation.

Rubrics that are currently being used to assess ICC learning outcomes are available here, https://www.ithaca.edu/icc/docs/iccrubrics/  , and ICC data and assessment is available here, https://www.ithaca.edu/icc/facstaff/protected/iccassessment/  

We will describe and interpret the values, beliefs, and behaviors of self and others in the context of historical and contemporary cultural institutions through the study and analysis of global identities in comparison with United States identities. Human rights abuses serve as an interpretive paradigm in global issues of power and justice through historical interpretations of current events with an interpretive and critical analysis of human rights statuses based upon the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

History in the News follows historical and contemporary political, cultural and social interpretations of current global and national current events with an eye toward anticipating future trends and developments. This perspective is especially relevant in the latter half of the course when examining larger social science related themes of technology, health, the environment, sports and social and gender rights protected in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Power and Justice asks how both power and justice are related and how they can be balanced.  History in the News aligns with this theme through an examination of power structures and issues of justice that are deeply connected to both conflict and resolution through a study of global identities, social issues and larger interdisciplinary themes. History in the News identifies and evaluates the historical and contemporary relationship between power and justice distributed, transformed and mobilized through a variety of global developments seeking justice and social and cultural transformation. Special focus is given to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and reports of Human Rights watch groups. Two three page analytical evaluative reports serve as artifacts in student assessment of meeting the power and Justice learning objective.

History in the News addresses the theme of identities through a comparison and contrast of identities of global regions, cultures and perspectives with our own American/U.S. collective and individual identities and perspectives. These identities are assessed through an evaluation of current events utilizing varied historical contexts and interpretations through scholarly publications and current news media sources.  Two three page analytic evaluative reports serve as artifacts in student assessments of meeting the identities learning objective.

Additional reference sources

William J Duiker, Contemporary World History (Wadsworth, 2014)

The Globalization Reader 5th Edition

Frank J. Lechner (Editor), John Boli (Editor), The Globalization Reader (Wiley-Blackwell, December 2014)

The Human Rights Reader: Major Political Essays, Speeches and Documents From Ancient Times to the Present 2nd Edition

Sources and assignments will be posted weekly on Sakai depending on developments in the news

Also, additional sources of interest -

Current History Journal of Contemporary World Affairs and Foreign Affairs are accessed through the library database - https://ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/guide.php?subject=history_news  

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml#atop  UNUDHR 

http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/index.html documents to support the study of world history from a working-class and non-Eurocentric perspective.

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/  

http://worldhistorymatters.org/  

http://www.bbc.com/  

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/watch/  

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/  

http://www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/  

http://www.worldpress.org/gateway.htm  

http://www.aeinstein.org/ The Albert Einstein Institution works to advance the worldwide study and strategic use of nonviolent action

http://www.hrw.org/  

http://www.amnesty.org/  

http://worldchannel.org/programs/global-voices/  

http://www.dw.com/en/tv/global-3000/s-11487  

http://www.projectlooksharp.org/  

http://einaudi.cornell.edu/programs  

Fake or Real? How to Self-Check the News and Get the Facts

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts

Use of the Writing Center is a free service provided to all members of the Ithaca College campus community. Please consider including information on the Writing Center in your syllabus this fall.

All writers can benefit from a second reader. At the Writing Center, trained faculty and peer tutors work with folks at any stage of the writing process, from pre-writing through drafting, revising, and editing. We believe in helping people become better writers through a facilitated understanding of their own processes: we are not a drop-off editing service, but rather a holistic, caring, and professional place where undergraduate, graduate, staff, and faculty writers can discover fruitful, clear ways to best express and explain their thoughts and research.

More information for faculty can be found on our website. We also offer brief in-class presentations by peer tutors that further introduce students to the Writing Center and our scheduling software; if you are interested in such a presentation, please email faculty director Jaime Warburton at jwarburton@ithaca.edu to arrange a time.

(Although we strongly encourage all writers to visit the Writing Center at some point during their time at Ithaca College, we also request that faculty not issue a blanket requirement for all class members to visit the Center for the same assignment, as such provisions strain our resources and may block access from students who have a true need for services.)

Please feel free to include some or all of the following language in your syllabus:

The Writing Center aims to help students from all disciplines, backgrounds, and experiences to develop greater independence as writers.  We are committed to helping students see writing as central to critical and creative thinking. 

In a friendly, comfortable atmosphere, writers at all levels participate in one-on-one conferences with advanced student and faculty tutors to work on effective strategies for all aspects of the writing process. Topics explored in these conferences may include

o   idea generation, focus, and organization

o   understanding of assignments and readings

o   comprehensive rewriting of drafts

o   sentence structure and style

o   grammar, punctuation, and spelling

o   research and note-taking methods

o   source documentation

We offer these services for students in all disciplines: humanities and sciences, business, health sciences and human performance, communications, and music. In our conferences, we encourage students to develop confidence as independent thinkers and writers. This means that we will not revise or correct papers for students, but instead will help them learn how to do so for themselves.

Hours for the spring semester begin Wednesday, January 24th, and are as follows: Monday-Friday from 9-5 and Sunday-Thursday, 7-10 PM. 

Appointments can be made by visiting http://ithaca.mywconline.com