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The course information listed in this section contains detailed information about many of the courses offered in the Department of Philosophy and Religion. 

This supplemental information is specific to each semester and provides more information about particular classes than can be found in the HomerConnect schedule or in the Undergraduate Catalog. Additional information about individual courses may be obtained from the instructor of a particular course.

Note for Current Students and Advisors

We encourage current students to work with their advisers while using this supplemental course listing as a resource to schedule classes.

Be sure to check the appropriate Catalog to review your major requirements. Your catalog year depends on the year in which you declared your major. For example, if you matriculated in fall 2010 but declared your major in spring 2012, you would follow the 2011–2012 Catalog requirements, not the 2010–2011 Catalog requirements.

The Office of Academic Advising is an additional resource for students and advisers.

Current Semester Courses - Spring 2021

If you experience enrollment issues in HOMER with any of our courses, please let the instructor for that course know.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10100-01,-04 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course introduces the students to the discipline by featuring a selection of classical readings and arguments pertaining to the problems of knowledge, morality, free will, individuality and authenticity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 10100-02,-03 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on perennial philosophical problems including: (1) Can I survive my death? (2) Am I free? (3) What is the relationship between the mind and the body? (4) Does God exist? (5) What ought we to do? We will read mostly contemporary philosophical works.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Homework assignments, essays, exams.

PHIL 20300-01,-02 Introduction to Logic ESTS HM LA LMEL LMSP LSCO NS QL TWOS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu 
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
Attributes: ESTS, HM, LMEL, LMSP, LSCO, NS, QL, TIII, TWOS 
STUDENTS: Any. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An introductory treatment of contemporary symbolic logic. Topics include argument structure, validity/invalidity, and soundness and unsoundness, truth-tables, and an exploration of elementary propositional logic including truth-functions and formal proofs. Time-permitting, some elementary quantificational logic may be covered. 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four exams.

PHIL 20800-01 Puzzles and Paradoxes HU LA WI
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST
COURSE DESCRIPTION: One of the central aims of philosophy is to aim for extreme conceptual clarity. Paradoxes are areas where our conceptual resources are stretched to their limits. The puzzles that we deal with in this class are sets of propositions each member of which is intuitively true but logic tells us at least one of which must be false. Possible topics include paradoxes of space and time; paradoxes of decision-making; ethical paradoxes; paradoxes of belief and knowledge; and paradoxes of logic and set theory.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mixture of lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, response papers, exams.

PHIL 21200-01 Introduction to Ethics HM HU LA LMEL LMSP LSCO TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to the philosophical study of ethics.  We will investigate what particular types of actions are right and wrong, what kinds of lives are worth living, and what particular types of character traits are valuable.  We will examine prominent answers to these questions, from both historical and contemporary philosophers.  
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: papers, exams, participation.

PHIL 23000-01 Bioethics ENHU ESHU HM LA LMEL LMSP LSCO TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in biomedical ethics. The developments in biomedical science that occurred in the course of the XX century have opened the door to some important philosophical problems: When – if at all – is it morally appropriate to terminate a pregnancy? Are doctors morally justified in helping patients to end their lives? Is it morally permissible to change the genetic make-up of our children? Is cloning morally objectionable? To what extent should the state be allowed to legislate over issues such as these? The course in bioethics is meant to acquaint you with some key arguments, perspectives, ideas, and positions that philosophers have developed concerning these questions. While the course does not promise to give simple answers to these questions, it will aim at helping you to acquire the philosophical skills necessary to develop such answers. You will learn how to read and to understand philosophical texts dealing with issues in bioethics, how to parse and to assess philosophical arguments, and how to come up with both critical and constructive arguments of your own.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, group-work, debate.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), research paper (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

PHIL 26500-01 Philosophical Problems in Law HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines differing views of the nature, function and authority of law. It then applies these views to concrete issues such as the scope of legitimate punishment (including debates over the death penalty), the existence of international law, and the limits of a legal right to free speech. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, in-class debates; traditional grading.

PHIL 34500-01 Philosophy of Culture HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15 per section
PREREQUISITES: One 200-level course in any of the following departments: ANTH, CLTC, ENGL, HIST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the human capacity for forming alternative conceptions of mind and world as well as the impact of this capacity on the structure of society and culture. Through a consideration of contemporary debates in philosophy, the course explores the questions of how languages and cultures give rise to different mindsets, how communication is possible across linguistic and cultural barriers, what role empathy plays in understanding others, and whether we can reconcile causal descriptions of human actions with the notion of free rational agency.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Participation and take-home essay exams.

PHIL 36000-01 Philosophy of Mind 1 HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Those interested in the issues described below.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we shall investigate philosophical issues that occur in various theories about the human mind. Topics include such questions as: Is the mind physical or nonphysical? What is the relation between mental states and bodily behaviors? What is a mental state of mind? What kinds of beings or complex systems can possess minds? What is psychological explanation?
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Three exams and one paper.

PHIL 41000-01 Philosophy Capstone CP HU LA WI
3 credits                     
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: WRTG 10600 or ICSM 108xx or ICSM 118xx; senior standing; restricted to philosophy majors, philosophy-religion majors, philosophy minors.
STUDENTS: Students finishing their major or minor in philosophy, graduating this year.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will have three major components. About 1/3 of the course will be dedicated to addressing philosophical issues that students would like to discuss. Everyone will have a chance to select a text (an article or a short monograph) and lead our class discussion on it. The second 1/3 of our course will be dedicated to a research project of each student’s choice. Each student will be working on a longer research paper throughout the semester. Once a week, we will go over the progress that students will be making on that front. The last 1/3 of the course will be dedicated to discussing students’ educational path at IC – we will talk about the components of IC’s general education and prepare the e-portfolio to be ready for graduation.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class presentation and facilitation, weekly research work, research paper, completion of the ICC e-portfolio. 

Upcoming Semester Courses - Fall 2021

If you experience enrollment issues in HOMER with any of our courses, please let the instructor for that course know.

PHIL 10100-01 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Any.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce students to basic philosophical methods and problems. Topics to be covered include the existence/nonexistence of God, theory of knowledge, the mind/body problem, theories of moral obligation and social and political organization.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams, final exam, class presentation and class participation.

PHIL 10100-02,-03 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on perennial philosophical problems including: (1) Can I survive my death? (2) Am I free? (3) What is the relationship between the mind and the body? (4) Does God exist? (5) What ought we to do? We will read mostly contemporary philosophical works.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mixture of lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, papers, exams.

PHIL 10100-04,-05 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course introduces the students to the discipline by featuring a selection of classical readings and arguments pertaining to the problems of knowledge, morality, free will, individuality and authenticity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 20300-01,-02 Introduction to Logic ESTS HM LA LMEL LMSP LSCO NS QL TIII TWOS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu 
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC,
CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG. 
STUDENTS: Any. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce the students to the fundamentals of formal reasoning. 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four exams. 

PHIL 20800-01 Puzzles and Paradoxes LA WI
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST
COURSE DESCRIPTION: One of the central aims of philosophy is to aim for extreme conceptual clarity. Paradoxes are areas where our conceptual resources are stretched to their limits. The puzzles that we deal with in this class are sets of propositions each member of which is intuitively true but logic tells us at least one of which must be false. Possible topics include paradoxes of space and time; paradoxes of decision-making; ethical paradoxes; paradoxes of belief and knowledge; and paradoxes of logic and set theory.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mixture of lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, papers, essay exams.

PHIL 21200-01 Introduction to Ethics HM HU LA LMEL LMSP LSCO TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the problems and theories of normative and critical ethics. Readings are selected from both classical and contemporary sources. We will consider a wide range of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, war, capital punishment, the treatment of animals, and aid to the needy.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 3 exams, final exam, short written assignments (class participation too); traditional grading.

PHIL 23000-01 Bioethics ENHU ESHU HM LA LMEL LMSP LSCO TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in biomedical ethics. The developments in biomedical science that occurred in the course of the XX century have opened the door to some important philosophical problems: When – if at all – is it morally appropriate to terminate a pregnancy? Are doctors morally justified in helping patients to end their lives? Is it morally permissible to change the genetic make-up of our children? Is cloning morally objectionable? To what extent should the state be allowed to legislate over issues such as these? The course in bioethics is meant to acquaint you with some key arguments, perspectives, ideas, and positions that philosophers have developed concerning these questions. While the course does not promise to give simple answers to these questions, it will aim at helping you to acquire the philosophical skills necessary to develop such answers. You will learn how to read and to understand philosophical texts dealing with issues in bioethics, how to parse and to assess philosophical arguments, and how to come up with both critical and constructive arguments of your own.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, group-work, debate.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), research paper (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

PHIL 24000-01 Philosophy in Film 1 ENHU ESHU HU LA MAP
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 45713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Problems in philosophy of film: realism, authorship, narration, evaluative criteria, and social significance of film.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 26500-01 Philosophical Problems in Law HM HU LA TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines differing views of the nature, function and authority of law. It then applies these views to concrete issues such as the scope of legitimate punishment (including debates over the death penalty), the existence of international law, and the limits of a legal right to free speech. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, in-class debates; traditional grading.

PHIL 28600-01 Philosophy and Literature LA WI
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: WRTG 10600 or ICSM 10800 or ICSM 11800; sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Discussion of issues emerging from the relation between philosophy and literary fiction: Why are we emotionally invested in what happens to fictional characters? Can the author ask the reader to imagine anything at all, or are there some things that a work of fiction simply cannot violate? What can a philosopher learn from the great works of fiction? The course will focus on philosophical texts, both classical and contemporary. The readings will not be long, but they will be dense and challenging. This is a writing intensive course, which means that we will be spending quite a bit of time on improving our writing skills by revising drafts and talking about writing as such.
COURSE FORMAT: Lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: 10 reading responses (500 words each), research paper (3,000 words).

PHIL 33000-01 The Good Life HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15.
PREREQUISITES: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor. 
STUDENTS: Those willing to work hard.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To examine one of the basic questions of the human condition: What is a good life? Readings from classical and contemporary thinkers.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Traditional.

PHIL 38200-01 Twentieth-Century Philosophy: Language, Mind, and Meaning HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Philosophy majors and minors.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To investigate the main trends and concerns of 20th century analytic philosophy. Readings will be from important works in logical positivism, the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein, and recent varieties of pragmatism and naturalism.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Lecture and discussion.