Spring 2016

Daily Grind
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
The Daily Grind welcomes faculty weekdays from 8:00 - 10:00 am for coffee. Please drop by to chat with colleagues, watch the news, or just get ready for the workday.
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NOTE: Events are listed in order by date. Please scroll down.

Events are open to faculty and staff.
Registration is encouraged; walk- ins are always welcome.

JANUARY

Center for Faculty Excellence Webinar: It’s All About “Firsts”

Wednesday, January 20, 2016, 3:15 - 3:35 p.m.
How do you plan for the first day of class or the first minutes of each class? Too many choices emerge, what to do now or what to do later? This webinar session examines why and how to set first day/minutes of class activity priorities. Sample teaching strategies that address positive classroom climate and community building will be discussed as well as engaging students in syllabus review. Join the live webinar hosted by Judith Ross-Bernstein at the Center for Faculty Excellence by logging in to https://ithaca.adobeconnect.com/cfe.
New to Adobe Connect? To help you prepare to be "webinar ready," check out this resource in advance of the session: http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/products/adobeconnect/pdfs/VQS_Guide_for_Participants.pdf.

*TELE Webinar Series: Setting Up Your Sakai Course Site
Friday, January 22, 2016, 9:00 a.m.
A course site in Sakai is a great way to share information, assignments, grades, and resources with your students. This 20-minute webinar will demonstrate the process of creating a course site from start to finish. We will briefly introduce the available tools and site settings to help you get started. No prior Sakai experience is required.
Click here to join the webinar on 1/22/2016 at 9:00 AM
New to Adobe Connect? To help you prepare to be "webinar ready," check out the Adobe Connect Participant Guide.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

FEBRUARY

Coffee, Croissants, and Conversation with Provost Ben Rifkin
Wednesday, February 3, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Faculty and staff are invited to join us in the Center for Faculty Excellence for an informal conversation about teaching and scholarship with our Provost, Dr. Ben Rifkin. Ben will talk about the importance of the teacher-scholar* model at IC and will welcome the experiences and wisdom of our many faculty who excel as teacher-scholars. This is a great opportunity to engage with your peers on one of the most important topics on campus.
*Scholar here refers to the domain of expertise of each faculty member, whether traditional liberal education disciplines or professional practice domains.

*TELE Webinar Series
Using the Sakai Lesson Tool to Complement your Syllabus
Wednesday, February 3, 3:30-4:00 pm
From your office or home, simply log in here to join the learning.
Most classes distribute a course syllabus that includes a daily or weekly schedule of readings, content, and in class and out of class activities and assignments. This webinar will demonstrate how you can use the Sakai Lessons tool to structure and organize your course materials that will make them easy to find for your students. You can link to and embed content and other media as well as link to Sakai Assignments, Quizzes, or forums.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

Ornithography: A mixed media series by Carla Stetson
Reception date: Thursday February 4, 2016, 4:00-5:00 pm
Exhibit: Center for Faculty Excellence, January 25-May 31, 2016
In the artist’s words: Ornithography is a series of mixed media collages based on historical illustrations of birds. Interwoven and complex, these works evoke thoughts about absence or extinction. Via deconstructing and reconstructing from appropriated historical illustrations and incorporating photographs of my surroundings and other altered images, I use this series to comment on graphic display, on collecting, on image as historical artifact, as well as questioning what loss of species and habitats means to us.

*TELE Webinar Series
Using the Sakai Lesson Tool to Complement your Syllabus
Tuesday, February 9, 10:30-11:00 am
Most classes distribute a course syllabus that includes a daily or weekly schedule of readings, content, and in class and out of class activities and assignments. This webinar will demonstrate how you can use the Sakai Lessons tool to structure and organize your course materials that will make them easy to find for your students. You can link to and embed content and other media as well as link to Sakai Assignments, Quizzes, or forums.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Using lynda.com to Support Your Teaching

Thursday, February 11, 10:00-10:30am
lynda.com is a great resource for learning new skills and finding quick answers to questions. Find out how you can use this tool to supplement your course and address skill gaps in this 20-minute webinar which will demonstrate the various ways that lynda.com can be leveraged for instructional purposes. All staff, faculty, and students have complete access to the lynda.com library. Learn more about lynda.com here!
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Session
Using Lesson Builder: Exemplars

Monday, February 15, 1:30-2:30pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Dress Up Your Discussion Board and Take it Out to Dinner: Make Your Discussion Boards Sexy Again

Tuesday, February 16, 2:00-3:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply log in here and click "Join Session".)
Discussion boards are often the staple of online classes. Research has shown that when properly instituted, discussion board assignments can produce text-based discussions that demonstrate higher order thinking (Giacumo 790). Despite this finding, discussion boards are also frequently maligned as ineffective for actually producing valuable class discussion. Students complain of "death by discussion board." In this panel, four college-level online coordinators at Kennesaw State University will take you on a re-visioning of discussion board practice. This presentation intends to cover a broad set of experiences, numerous perspectives on best practices, what the latest research says about discussions, and some takeaway ideas for attendees.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Overcoming Challenges to a Flipped Classroom

Wednesday, February 17, 11:00- 12:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply log in here and click "Join Session".)
Students are accustomed to passively listening to a lecture presented by a faculty member, resulting in disengaged students. Flipping a class can lead to active participation and faculty and student satisfaction, without losing learning gains. But there are many challenges along the way. In this workshop we will discuss these challenges and speaker will discuss how they overcame their own barriers to flipping over the past four years. Together we will find ways to more actively engage students through the classroom flip approach.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Topping Out on Bloom: Technology for Student Projects

Thursday, February 18, 11:00-12:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply log in here and click "Join Session".)
Putting technology in the hands of students with tools like Voice Thread, iMovie, podcasts, and Blogs allows students to wrestle with course content at high levels of cognition. The highest levels of Bloom’s Taxonomic Classification are often ignored in course design. This session will encourage you to think of assignments that encourage students to use Bloom’s higher level of cognition: synthesis and creativity.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Working with Group Activities in an Online Class

Thursday, February 18, 2:00-3:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply login here and click "Join Session".)
Much has been made in the literature about the changes faculty go through as they move into online teaching. Far fewer studies have focused on how teaching online might influence face-to-face teaching. This session will describe such a study and facilitate a discussion of how this phenomenon might be leveraged to encourage face-to-face teaching innovation and promote greater faculty participation in online teaching.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
How to Be Human: Teaching Real People in Digital Spaces
Monday, February 22, 2:00-3:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply login here and click "Join Session".)
A common problem in the online classroom is the absent or robot professor. Personality is a key part of any classroom experience. Through this engaging presentation, learn ways to “be yourself” online by creating a strong faculty presence and modeling for students what it means to be an active, involved member of a learning community. Get new ideas you can implement immediately for how to personalize your online classroom, from news to discussions, from content to grades, and more: • Understand how improved faculty presence fosters a stronger learning community consisting of students who connect, engage, and succeed in the digital classroom. • Analyze and evaluate faculty presence in your own course design to see whether you are most effectively reaching students and modeling online interactions in ways that benefit students. • Create courses that reflect a present, engaged, active, and approachable professor.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Using lynda.com to Support Your Teaching

Monday, February 22, 4:00-4:30 pm
From your office or home, simply log in here to join the learning.
lynda.com is a great resource for learning new skills and finding quick answers to questions. Find out how you can use this tool to supplement your course and address skill gaps in this 20-minute webinar which will demonstrate the various ways that lynda.com can be leveraged for instructional purposes. All staff, faculty, and students have complete access to the lynda.com library. Learn more about lynda.com here!
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Reaching Millennial Learners Using Next-Generation Methods in the Classroom

Tuesday, February 23, 1:00-2:00pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply login here and click "Join Session".)
Reading and writing have changed in the midst of ongoing technological innovations, and large numbers of the cohort referred to as “millennials” have entered college. Next-generation methods, defined as tools that incorporate the use of social media, new media, and various digital technologies as writing tools, can be effective in reaching millennial learners. This interactive session shares the data from an action research project investigating these learners.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

The Fair Use Factors: Their History and Application (*TELE Session)
Thursday, February 25, 2:00-3:00 pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
The language of the fair use factors has changed very little since the nineteenth century, but the doctrine of fair use has changed a great deal. Understanding the history of the factors, particularly their changing importance, is crucial to making accurate fair use decisions today. This webcast will focus on fair use cases from the last forty years, tracing the relative importance of the four statutory factors and their subfactors. Participants will then be asked to practice applying current fair use law to a series of hypothetical fact patterns.
Learning outcomes:
• Learn the history of fair use factors and subfactors including commerciality, publication status, and transformativeness.
• Learn the current relative importance of the four fair use factors and their subfactors.
• Use this knowledge of the fair use factors to make fair use decisions.
Presenter: Ana Enriquez is a copyright lawyer who focuses on the issues facing libraries, universities, and other cultural institutions. She is a member of the Illinois and Massachusetts bars and is a graduate of Berkeley Law and Harvard College.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Creating Interactive Video Lectures to Increase Student Engagement

Friday, February 26, 10:00-11:00am
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply login here and click "Join Session".)
Video lectures are a common way to help students engage in online learning; however, students may not consistently view them. Embedding tasks within lectures can encourage student engagement and allow instructors to assess student engagement. This session covers designing video lectures to maximize interest, increase instructor presence, and encourage active learning. Topics include organization, use of graphics/text, length, different formats, and interactive tasks to facilitate active learning. We will review various tools for this purpose, including Captivate, Camtasia, Articulate, Screencast-O-Matic, Zaption, Vialogues, VoiceThread, and ScreenFlow, and demonstrate how to use Zaption to enhance lectures.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Effective Online Grading

Friday, February 26, 2:00-3:00 pm
Join us for viewing and discussion at the Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center.
(Or from your office or home, simply login here and click "Join Session".)
Effective online teaching-- involving active learning, student participation, and teacher-student communication-- can be enhanced by our assessment practice. How can we leverage the online environment to make our grading a successful teaching tool without turning assessment into drudgery? How can we be effective but still avoid a joy-killing time investment? The sometimes differing perspectives of two experienced online English instructors will offer the audience a change to recognize and/or revise their own practices as the presenters explain the different methods they've used to turn assessment into a pedagogical tool, increasing student agency instead of appropriating it.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

*TELE Webinar Series
Taking Control of Sakai Gradebook

Wednesday, March 2, 3:30-4:00
From your office or home, simply log in here to join the learning.
This webinar will give you tips and tricks for making the most of your Sakai grade book to communicate grades to students, generate midterm grades, and save you time. We will go over setting up the grade book and whether or not to use categories and weighting. We will discuss how Sakai calculates course grades and how to import from a spreadsheet.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

Casual Colloquy: Race, Gender, Sexualities, and Nation in Media
Tuesday, March 8, 2016, 5:00-6:30
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
In observance of International Women's Day, faculty and staff members will share their perspectives from their own disciplines and personal experience and invite all to participate in a small-group conversation about the many complex issues surrounding race, gender, sexualities, and nation in media (using the broadest definition thereof). Students invited! With coffee and cake.
In conversation with (panelists confirmed to date): Ann Marie Adams (Strategic Communication), Hayley Cavino (Women’s & Gender Studies), Cynthia Henderson (Theatre Arts), Matthew Holtmeier (Screen Studies), Nia Makepeace (Education, Women’s & Gender Studies), Maura Stephens (Independent Media, Journalism), Rhonda Vanover (Cinema and Photography), Robyn Wishna (Cinema & Photography), Facilitated by Patricia Zimmermann (Screen Studies).
Cosponsored by the Center for Faculty Excellence, the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival, the Park Center for Independent Media, and the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies.

Faculty Advising and HomerConnect: How to Utilize Online Records when Working with Students
Tuesday, March 22 4:00-5:00 pm.
Wednesday, March 23, 9:00-10:00 am.
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Presented by Ryan DeLany, Manager of the Academic Advising Center, with assistance from academic advisers Lisa Fell, Katie Burke, and Amber Cloke.
Sometimes the most daunting part of an advising session is accessing and interpreting your advisee’s academic records. This faculty workshop will focus on the advising features of HomerConnect. We will review the unofficial academic transcript, the degree evaluation, and other pertinent student information categories. This session is designed to help faculty advisors prepare for the upcoming advising and registration period in April.

Living Pictures: Inclusive Pedagogy ***CANCELLED***
Wednesday, March 23, 2016, select one session 10:00-11:15 or 2:00-3:15
Presenters: Sherry Deckman, Assistant Professor, Department of Middle and High School Education, Lehman College and Judith Ross-Bernstein, Assistant Director, Center for Faculty Excellence
Please join faculty at the CFE as we investigate the potential of using classroom tableaux vivant, living pictures. Tableau asks students to envision the action and events they read about in a text. In this workshop, as an example, we will interrogate teaching the concept of white privilege with your students using tableaux. While this is just one example, teachers can apply this strategy to nearly every discipline. In the process of creating tableaux students are involved in developing their senses, building and activating background knowledge, asking questions, determining what is important, making inferences, and synthesizing the material they have read. As an active and dramatic teaching activity, tableaux support student development and promotes inclusive classrooms.
Faculty in this workshop will: interrogate the concept of white privilege as it impacts our own work in higher education, consider tableaux as an active inclusive teaching strategy, and describe the potential applications of tableau strategies across disciplines.
*In advance, participants please read White People Need to Acknowledge Benefits of Unearned Privilege by Robert Jensen.

Faculty Advising and HomerConnect: How to Utilize Online Records when Working with Students
Monday, March 28, 12:00-1:00pm, bring your lunch.
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Presented by Ryan DeLany, Manager of the Academic Advising Center, with assistance from academic advisers Lisa Fell, Katie Burke, and Amber Cloke.
Sometimes the most daunting part of an advising session is accessing and interpreting your advisee’s academic records. This faculty workshop will focus on the advising features of HomerConnect. We will review the unofficial academic transcript, the degree evaluation, and other pertinent student information categories. This session is designed to help faculty advisors prepare for the upcoming advising and registration period in April.

Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival
FLEFF/CFE Opening Forum: Landscapes

Monday, March 28, 2016, 3:00-6:30 pm
Roy H. Park Auditorium, Park School of Communications
The FLEFF/CFE Roundtables are about discussion and exchange of ideas. We invite you to bring an open mind and your intellectual curiosity as we debate and explore issues related to this year’s FLEFF theme of Landscapes. The Roundtables will feature cross-disciplinary conversations among Ithaca College faculty exploring landscapes across different dimensions. Each Roundtable will include opportunities for exchange among panelists and the audience.
Open to students, faculty, and the public. Drop in and out anytime. Refreshments provided.
This forum is supported by the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival, the Center for Faculty Excellence, the Park School of Communication, the Park Foundation, and Ithaca College.

*TELE Event: Build Your Teaching Toolkit: Assessment Rubrics and the Learning Experience
Tuesday, March 29, 2016, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Presenter: Mary Jo Watts, Instructional Technology Specialist, DIIS
Please join us as we explore the uses of rubrics as tools for teaching and learning. We will consider grading rubrics for peer-to-peer review, ways to co-construct assessment measures with students, how to address consistency in learning outcomes, and ways to ease the workload of instructors.
*Technology-Enhanced Learning & Engagement (TELE) Collaborative: CFE (Wade Pickren, Judith Ross-Bernstein), Library (Lis Chabot), ITS (Marilyn Dispensa, Matt Gorney, Tony Tabone, Mary Jo Watts)

Community-Based Learning Spotlight Event: Musicians and Accountants!
Monday, April 4, 2016, 4:30-6:30 reception, poster session, and live performance.
McHenry Lounge, School of Music
Celebrating the Music as Medicine Project & the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program. Co-sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement and the Center for Faculty Excellence. Open to faculty, staff, and students.

Design Thinking: What Will it Mean to be Human in a Digital Age?
Tuesday, April 5, 2016 1:00-2:00 pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Dr. Patrice Torcivia, Cornell University
Design thinking emphasizes a solution-based approach that leads to creative solutions that might not have been anticipated using traditional, analytical methods. Now, in places like Stanford’s dschool, students are using design thinking to address social problems, create new tech tools, and generate alternative solutions to difficult problems.
In this design thinking session, we will examine how to create a learning ecosystem that will graduate future generations of creative, socially responsible, lifelong learners with the competencies to be agile in a rapidly changing digital economy. Our departure points for discussion include: What does it mean to be human in the digital age? What does it mean to learn in the digital age?
Please join us in a lively discussion and share your stories and experiences as we prepare our students to enter “The Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

Designing Your SoTL Project
Presented by Deborah Rifkin, Associate Professor, Music Theory, History, and Composition
Thursday, April 7, 2016, 2:30-3:30
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is a practice of looking closely and critically at student learning in order to improve courses and programs, and to share insights with other educators. In this workshop, we will review SoTL processes and methods, and help participants design their own SoTL project. Participants should come with a classroom or program problem or challenge they would like to address.

Mental Hygiene in Mexico: When the Post-Revolutionary Psychiatrists got out of the Insane Asylum
Presented by Dr. Andres Rios Molina, Historian, National Autonomous University of Mexico
April 11, 2016 12:00-1:00 (feel free to bring your lunch) Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
An expert on Mexican and Colombian psychiatry and mental health, Dr. Rios Molina's talk will explore how and why Mexican doctors began to search for treatment modalities outside of the traditional psychiatric hospital in the years following the end of the Mexican Revolution. Dr. Rios Molina will explore how cultural and clinical attitudes and ideas shaped this important effort to reform mental health treatments. Originally from Colombia, Dr. Rios Molina has published a number of books on Mexican psychiatric practices and patients.
For more information, see http://www.historicas.unam.mx/investigacion/riosmolina.html

Digital Tools and the Undergraduate Curriculum: Integrating Technology into a Humanities Major
April 19, 2016 12:10-1:00pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Presented by Elizabeth Belanger, Assistant Professor of American Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
The workshop presents a series of methods that utilize digital tools to engage students in the classroom. While many of us are aware of the large scale digital scholarship emerging from university’s like Cornell, lesser known is the shape and scale of digital scholarship at smaller comprehensive colleges and liberal arts schools. This workshop focuses of efforts to integrate small scale digital projects into undergraduate humanities classrooms. It traces the role digital tools have played in 100 level, 200 level and 300 level classes, examining how to scaffold digital skills for novice learners, how to design and “sell” digital projects to students and how to assess student learning outcomes of digital assignments. The digital tools and assignments discussed include: digital stories, WordPress, GIS and open source web design platforms like Webley. Participants will leave with sample assignments, rubrics and other teaching resources. This is intended to be a hands-on workshop and faculty are encouraged to come with questions and ideas of how they might integrate digital tools into their own classrooms and curriculums.

APRIL

Coffee, Croissants, and Conversation with former President Peggy Ryan Williams
Tuesday, April 26, 2016, 9:00-10:00am
Clark Lounge
Please join us as we host a discussion with former President Williams about her recent trip to Saudi Arabia where she taught in a women’s university as part of her work with the Women in Leadership in Higher Education Forum. All are welcome and we especially invite those who have participated in our Women in the Academy project and those who have served in the HERS program.
Sponsored by the Center for Faculty Excellence, Women’s and Gender Studies, & the Office of International and Extended Studies

Top of the Mountain or Over the Hill? Thinking About the Future as an Advanced Career Academic
Coffee, Croissants, and Conversation with Linda Gasser, Career & Organization Development Consultant; former IC Business School faculty member.
Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 8:30-10:00 am
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Have you taken time to reflect upon your career as it has progressed? Are you wondering what some next steps might be: new interests? entering administration? doing something different? Whether you are at the top of your game or find that your interests & motivations are changing, it is good to explore the thinking, myths, perceptions, and potential options for yourself as you enter a later stage in your career, work, and family life. This discussion will provide a forum to share with other educators/academics/researchers some of our perspectives on the variety of age and work transitions that may lie ahead.

Assessing the Health Status of Manual Laborers in Sichuan Providence China: Developing a Baseline for Health Interventions
Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 12:00pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Dr. Xue Li, and her research team collected data from 4 different types manual laborers working in Chengdu China and at selected sites within Sichuan Providence. These workers were asked to complete a survey designed to assess their current health status and were then classified into one of three basic groups., Healthy, Sub-Healthy, and Diseased. Dr. Li will describe her research project, present her analysis, and discus the implications and importance of a basic health assessment for manual laborers in China. Working conditions, and other cultural/lifestyle factors will also be discussed. Her data is one of the first attempts to understand the health issues experienced by Chinese workers from the workers themselves. Come and discuss the health of Chinese manual laborers with our award-wining scholar in residence Dr. Xue Li.

Celebrating Your Success!
Thursday, May 5, 2016 3:00-5:00 pm
Emerson Suites, C
Join us as we celebrate the scholarly and creative accomplishments of our faculty and staff. Throughout the academic year many of our faculty and staff receive “kudos” for publishing books and scholarly articles, making award winning films, giving conference talks, commenting for the national media, etc. We have noticed and we invite you to help us celebrate the great work they are doing. We will have a panel on best ways to disseminate scholarly and creative work and we will include information on our new digital commons as a way to bring even more attention to the excellent work done at IC.

Fulbright Scholar Program Workshop and Luncheon
Tuesday, May 10, 2016, 12:00-1:00 pm
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Are you interested in teaching or conducting research abroad? Learn more about the Fulbright Scholar Program in a workshop with Dr. Anna Larsen, a 2010 Fulbright Scholar to Argentina. In this workshop, Fulbright Ambassador Dr. Anna Larsen will share her experiences as a Fulbright Scholar to Argentina in 2010. Scholars like Anna return to their campuses with new perspectives on their fields and fresh ideas for further international engagement. Faculty and administrators will learn about the benefits of Fulbright and the impact it can have personally and professionally.

The Inclusive Classroom: Community Building as Pedagogical Practice
Monday, May 16, 8:30- 4:00 pm
319 Gannett Center
Please join us for a lively day with Lott Hill and Soo La Kim from Learners at the Center*, a community of teachers collaborating to inspire, design, and share inclusive, equitable, learner-centered instructional philosophies and practices.
“Making the classroom a democratic setting where everyone feels a responsibility to contribute is a central goal of transformative pedagogy.” – bell hooks
**Event is full to capacity as of May 2, 2016. We apologize for the inconvenience.

It’s become increasingly important to recognize the diversity of identities and experiences our students bring into the classroom, as well as to acknowledge our own specific subject positions as teachers. But how do we create a truly inclusive classroom given this multiplicity of identities and perspectives? How do we create spaces of trust, empathy, equity, and respect that are conducive to active participation and that lay the social-emotional groundwork for deeper learning for all our students? We feel at the heart of the answer is community building, not as icebreakers quickly dispensed with early on, but as pedagogical practice and a vital component of creating the kinds of inclusive spaces that Ken Bain describes as the “natural critical learning environment.”

This hands-on, minds-on workshop will provide engaging, practical, student-centered approaches for you to adapt for the diverse needs of your unique students, classrooms, and disciplines. Instead of standing in front of you and telling you to engage students, we invite you to dive in, engage, and experience the learning as students might, while reflecting together on what it means to teach with empathy, to understand students' points of view and make room in the classroom for the expression of multiple perspectives, experiences, and identities.

We will examine:

  • What does it mean to design an inclusive and equitable curriculum and classroom?
  • How can we foster or sustain inclusion in our classrooms and curricula?
  • How should we rethink teaching practices in the age of global multiculturalism to engender excitement about learning?
  • How can we ensure that all students are engaged or talk during in-class discussions?
  • How do you get students to listen to each other and express their points of view while keeping a difficult conversation focused on the learning goals of the course?

*Lott Hill is a founding Senior Partner with Learners at the Center, LLC and the founding Executive Director of the Center for Innovation in Teaching Excellence at Columbia College Chicago. For nearly 20 years, Lott has been designing and teaching classes in service-learning, cultural studies, journalism, and creative writing as well as first-year and capstone courses. Lott’s fiction, poetry, and nonfiction have been published with numerous online and print-based sources including Metropolitan Universities, Adbusters, Spoon River Poetry Review, Peer Review, Advocate.com, and the 2nd Story Anthology: Briefly Knocked Unconscious by a Low Flying Duck.
*Soo La Kim is a founding Senior Partner with Learners at the Center, LLC and, until recently, was Director of the Center for Innovation in Teaching Excellence at Columbia College Chicago. At the end of May 2016, she will assume her new role as Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs in the School of Professional Studies at Northwestern University. Soo La began her career as an educator at the University of California, Irvine, where she taught courses in literature, writing, and interdisciplinary humanities and earned her Ph.D. in English in 2000. She went on to teach in the writing programs at Harvard and Princeton, and began her work in faculty development as Assistant Director in the Princeton Writing Program.

Talking About the "A" Word: Cross-Campus Assessment Exchanges
May, 26, 2016, 9:00 am - 2:30 pm, Clark Lounge, Campus Center (lunch included)
In coordination with campus wide stakeholders, the Center for Faculty Excellence invites you to participate in an active day devoted to dialogues about assessment. We will:

  • Identify the multiple layers of our roles and assessment practices across the Ithaca College campus;
  • Apply assessment tools and techniques across disciplines and co-curricular learning opportunities,
  • Create space for collegial dialogue that leads to unpacking challenges to assessment and resource development.

Please register for the day by selecting a small group work session with a facilitator. Session descriptions and bios are below:

Session: Formative Assessment
Facilitator: Dave Gondek

Pushing our students to deeper learning/engagement can be accomplished through formative assessments involving student reflection. In this break-out session, participants will share experiences which get students to reflect on their learning and experiences. Example topics include reflection prompts, graphic organizers, event/classroom engagement tools, and more. To evaluate the quality of reflection, a brief introduction to the continuum of student metacognition will be provided. Participants should come with a sample set of event/classroom /program learning objectives.

Dave Gondek: I am an Asst. Professor in the Biology department and a member of the national Biology Scholars Program. I have been an FYRE-Associate for the past two years and have taught in both ICSM and capstone courses. I serve on the H&S general education committee assessing the complimentary liberal arts program and capstone experiences. I am currently running a SOTL project exploring the impact of metacognition in student success/retention within STEM courses. Through these activities, I have been exploring different ways to elicit reflective practices from students in both the classroom and co-curricular activities.

Session: Creative Inquiry
Facilitator: Sara Haefeli

Typical assessment devices measure a student’s ability to recall and communicate content knowledge but are not adequate tools for measuring more subjective outcomes such as critical thinking and creative inquiry. This session will explore how to create student learning outcomes and assessment devices designed to measure skills that are perhaps more important than knowledge acquisition—creativity, inquiry, and analysis—using the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ Value Rubrics.

Please note: “creative inquiry” is not code for “art” here; the goal of the session is to teach students to ask compelling and interesting questions in any field.
Please bring: Course and/or program SLOs, a specific assignment or activity, and a rubric.

Sara Haefeli: I teach music history and philosophy of creativity courses in the School of Music. My article “From Answers to Questions: Fostering Student Creativity and Engagement in Research and Writing” will be published this summer in the Journal of Music History Pedagogy.

Session: Co-creating Goals with Students
Facilitator: Susan Adams Delaney

Susan Adams Delaney’s (Writing) recent focus has been on including students in assessment at classroom, department, and program levels, conducting inquiry alongside students. Engaging students at the curricular level isn’t new and its impact is well established. For example, ETS’ own researchers measured substantial improvement in test scores of students who felt that had a genuine stake in the results (Liu, Bridgeman, and Adler, 2012). Such engagement can range from having members of a class co-construct goals to creating an advisory panel to including student representatives on faculty committees. Interested in learning more? Bring a recent syllabus or program description to brainstorm possibilities.

Session: Mapping Student Learning Outcomes
Facilitators: Julie Dorsey and Lis Chabot

Mapping creates a visual representation of the relationship between learning outcomes and activities and/or assignments. Mapping is useful to assist in evaluation of programs to identify gaps and areas of strength to inform curriculum/program design. In this session, the facilitators will discuss various approaches to mapping student learning outcomes and examine the connection between mapping and assessment. Examples of completed map samples will be shared and mapping worksheets will be utilized. Attendees are encouraged to bring program and disciplinary SLOs to use during the session.

Julie Dorsey: As part of my role as Curriculum Director of the Department of Occupational Therapy, I oversee the assessment of SLOs for the OT BS/MS and Professional Entry-Level Masters programs. I serve on the HSHP Assessment Committee and am the faculty co-chair of the Middle States Working Group on Educational Effectiveness Assessment. One of my interests is in helping people/programs to design meaningful assessment plans that stem from a broad vision of the curriculum/program.

Lis Chabot: I serve as the staff co-chair of the Middle States Working Group on Educational Effectiveness Assessment and served on the Academic Assessment Committee. Currently the IC library collaborates with the Occupational Therapy faculty as they review their curriculum in relation to professional accreditation requirements. We also work with academic departments to develop curriculum maps that link research skill development to required course sequences in schools and disciplines.


Session: Developing SLO’s for Assessment
Facilitators: Vince DeTuri, Brendan Murday, and Jacqueline Robilatta

This workshop focuses on common pitfalls in writing Student Learning Outcomes. Specifically, we will focus on how to write a learning outcome that is assessment-friendly. Utilizing ICC SLOs (specifically those written for writing intensive courses) and FYRE SLOs as case studies, we will practice identifying obstacles to effectively written outcomes and collaboratively brainstorm new meaningful, manageable, and measurable outcomes.

Brendan, Jacqueline, and Vince individually have many years of assessment experience including membership and leadership on department, division/school, and all-college assessment committees. In addition, they have provided leadership on dozens of assessment projects focused on student learning. They will share their experiences and misadventures to help others craft well-stated learning outcomes that lead to meaningful assessment.

Session: Developing Effective Assessment Tools for Your Program
Facilitators: Phoebe Constaninou and Mai An Rumney

Well-designed assessment tools, such as rubrics, have the potential to clarify learning outcomes for students, simplify the evaluation process for faculty, and provide meaningful information for program improvement. The principles of good rubric writing are the same regardless of discipline or program. In this session, facilitators will share helpful tips for designing functional and effective rubrics while pointing out common pitfalls to avoid. Sample rubrics will be available and participants are encouraged to bring their own assessment tools to share and/or work on.

Mai An Rumney coordinates the joint effort of education programs across schools for continuous improvement and national accreditation. She collaborates with faculty and departments to build meaningful program assessment and helps create structures within Taskstream to simply the process, enhance transparency, and ease documentation and analysis. Mai An also serves on the Educational Effectiveness Assessment Middle States Working Group.

Phoebe Constantinou is an Associate Professor and undergraduates program coordinator for teacher education in the Department of Health Promotion and Physical Education. She teaches an assessment course for Health and Physical Education majors and authors program assessment reports for national accreditation. Phoebe also serves on the HSHP Assessment Committee and Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee.

Session: Telling Brilliant Stories with Data
Facilitator: Michele Lenhart

Can assessment be sexy? Simply presenting data in written or slide form can often be challenging to interpret or boring for the viewers. This workshop will open the conversation about how to bring data to life and use it to communicate a story to an audience. We will discuss ways to step back and think through the “what, so what, now what” of the data you want to share, talk about tools for creating effective visual representations, and actually practice designing a storyboard for your next assessment presentation. Please bring your own data from a recent assessment project so that we can practice hands-on-learning. The goal is for you to walk away inspired and excited to find better ways to present your program’s story.

Michele Lenhart: My career as an educator has been focused on creating the most promising learning opportunities for students in co-curricular settings. For two decades I have been keenly interested in understanding how to authentically assess that learning. I currently serve on the Educational Affairs Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee, and I have even been known to nerd-out about assessment at happy hour.

Session: Diversity in the Curriculum
Facilitators: Jessye Cohen Filipic and Doreen Hettich-Atkins

Join us for a conversation about ways to begin to assess student learning, behavior change, and thought processes around intercultural competency, cross-cultural communication, and diversity and inclusion. While we are not experts, we have begun to do some work in this area and would like to share what we’re learning and hear from others who are trying to assess what their students are learning and doing.

In your domain, what are you trying to teach or assess? What do you want to know about how your students are changing through their interactions with you? Assessment methods, rubrics, and models will be shared. Please bring your materials to share.

Doreen Hettich-Atkins serves as the Senior Associate to the Associate Provost for Student Life and has been at Ithaca College for 12 years. She coordinates assessment activities for all areas that report to Rory Rothman and Roger “Doc” Richardson. Doreen has presented on assessment topics regionally and nationally at student affairs conferences.

Jessye Cohen-Filipic is finishing her fourth year at Ithaca College as an Assistant Professor in Psychology. As a psychologist, she is keenly interested in assessment of many kinds. In this realm, she is particularly interested in assessing what students learn in skills-based or experiential learning courses.