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Next Semester Courses (Fall 2022)

ENGL 10000-01           Exploring the Major   HU LA 3A h                             

3 Credits           

ICC ATTRIBUTE:      N/A 

INSTRUCTOR:           Derek Adams, Muller 304 

ENROLLMENT:                    25 students per section 

PREREQUISITES:                 None 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:        This course intends to assist scholars interested and/or majoring in Literatures in English (primarily those in their first or second year) with understanding and exploring opportunities available to them during their time at Ithaca College and after graduation. As part of this, you will learn about the mission of a liberal arts education and contemplate the purpose of college. You will also work to define your own purpose in coming to Ithaca College and choosing your major. Though the course is primarily discussion-based, current faculty members and students in the major will deliver guest presentations to introduce you to important information and connect you to useful resources. You will actively pursue knowledge of yourself, your educational options, extra-curricular and professional interests, and you will learn research, writing and decision-making strategies that will benefit you while in college and beyond. We will also dedicate time in class for your own questions to be discussed. 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion with the occasional context-setting lecture 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: One 500-word personal reflection, and active participation in class discussions. 

ENGL 11200-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY: THIS AMERICAN LIFE (LA)

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Perspectives: HU/CA; Themes: Identities/Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation

INSTRUCTOR: Hugh Egan, 306 Muller, ext. 4-3563

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will read a wide range of American short fiction, gathered loosely around the themes of childhood, adolescence, adult relationships, aging and death. In the course of our reading and discussion, we will traverse issues related to American identity, especially as they are inflected by race, ethnicity, and gender. We will also become familiar with formal elements of the short story, including point of view, plot, tone, and dialogue. Over the course of the term, we will read a combination of classic and contemporary American stories. We will end the term by reading Alexander Weinstein’s collection, Children of the New World.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Largely discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Two short essays (2 pages), two longer essays (5-6 pages), a mid-term, a final exam, and class participation. Grading will be A-F. Because of the discussion-oriented format, class participation will be an important part of students’ final grades.

ENGL 11300, 01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Themes and Perspectives: Humanities; Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation.

INSTRUCTOR: Paul Hansom. Muller 321

ENROLLMENT: 20 per section

PREREQUISITE: None

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

What is poetry? What happens when you read it? To answer these questions, we’ll read a thematically, and formally broad range of poems and exercise an equally broad set of approaches to reading, thinking, and writing critically about poetry. We’ll begin by studying the formal elements of a poem thereby familiarizing ourselves with poetic terminology. Then, we will read poems from a modern and contemporary American context, examining a variety of themes with attention to the contextual forces of class politics, race, gender, and ecological concern.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mostly discussion, limited lecture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Two essays, two response papers, presentation questions and blogs. Grading will be A-F. Because of the discussion-based format of the course, participation will be an important part of students’ final grades.

ENGL 11300, 03, 04 Introduction to Poetry 3 Credits

ICC THEMES: Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation ICC PERSPECTIVES: Humanities and Creative Arts

INSTRUCTOR: Dan Breen

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: How does a poem produce meaning? What does poetry do with language? This course is an introduction to a) the constituent elements of poems and the vocabulary with which we can analyze them and b) the extraordinary variety and capaciousness of texts we call “poems.” The aim of this course is to arrive at a sense, both ample and precise, of what a poem is, what it does, how it does what it does, and, perhaps, why we should care.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion (online, mostly synchronous)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Short writing assignments, recitations, poetic compositions, annotated poetry anthology, lively participation.

ENGL 11300, Introduction to Poetry 3 Credits

ICC THEMES: Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation ICC PERSPECTIVES: Humanities and Creative Arts

INSTRUCTOR: Alexis Becker ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: How does a poem produce meaning? What does poetry do with language? This course is an introduction to a) the constituent elements of poems and the vocabulary with which we can analyze them and b) the extraordinary variety and capaciousness of texts we call “poems.” The aim of this course is to arrive at a sense, both ample and precise, of what a poem is, what it does, how it does what it does, and, perhaps, why we should care.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion (online, mostly synchronous)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Short writing assignments, recitations, poetic compositions, annotated poetry anthology, lively participation.

ENGL 18200-01           The Power of Injustice & the Injustice of Power                             HU LA 3A h 

TOPIC:                         Life at the Margins in American Literature 

3 Credits           

ICC ATTRIBUTE:        Diversity, Humanities Perspective, Power & Justice and Identities Themes 

INSTRUCTOR:             Derek Adams, Muller 304 

ENROLLMENT:           20 per section 

PREREQUISITES:        None 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:        Many individuals continue to feel as though they live at the margins of society, despite the “melting pot” rhetoric of inclusivity and acceptance that dominates narratives of American identity. While we commonly consider purposeful exclusion an act of injustice on the part of the powerful, we are often unaware of the way that subtle, hidden forms of power render particular groups and individuals powerless. American literature is one of the most widely utilized platforms for articulating the specific issues that arise in response to these forms of power. This course will use an array of American literary texts to explore the complexities of the life experiences of those who are forced by the powerful to live at the margins. We will read the work of Rebecca Harding Davis, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Junot Diaz, Adam Mansbach, ZZ Packer, and Tommy Orange.   

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion with the occasional lecture 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will closely examine course materials, actively engage in class discussions, write short textual analysis essays and a narrative analysis reflection, and regularly post to our Sakai Forum.

ENGL 19412-01, -02 Banned Books and Censorship Trials: Obscenity in the 20th Century

Instructor: Jennifer Spitzer

IC designation: Inquiry, Imagination, Innovation

Course Description: In this course we will read a range of literary texts that have been censored, banned, suppressed, or made infamous through high profile trials and legal battles. Our purpose is twofold: 1) to indulge the pleasurable act of reading “subversive” texts, and 2) to interrogate the forms and meanings of literary censorship in the twentieth century. While our key term will be obscenity, we will probe obscenity’s relationship to other categories of disapproval, including blasphemy, indecency, and pornography. We will also think about the unexpected effects of censorship, how the suppression of a text can become a sign of its merit, how censorship can both promote and hinder a text’s circulation and reception, and how censorship can turn authors into literary celebrities. A guiding question for our explorations will be when and under what conditions (if any) is it appropriate to censor literature? Texts for the course will include Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home.

Enrollment: 20 students

Format: Discussion-oriented seminar with student presentations and some brief opening lectures.

Course Requirements and Grading: Active class participation, one in-class presentation, short response papers, and formal essay.

English 19419-01,02  Story Power: Fairy Tales

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Identities AND Mind, Body, Spirit

INSTRUCTOR: Julie Fromer, 434 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Why do fairy tales have such enduring power to shape the stories that we tell ourselves and our children?  How have these stories shifted and transformed through time and across different media and cultures?  What can we learn about gender roles, class structures, social and political values, and the goal and function of storytelling itself? We will focus on a number of “classic” fairy tales, such as Cinderella, Snow White, and Little Red Riding Hood, reading English translations of the tales collected by German and Italian folklorists.  While we all know the basic plots of many of the stories we’ll be reading, we will allow the texts to speak to us in new ways.  Then, we will follow these tales’ transformations, reading revisions of older tales and exploring the ways oral and literary fairy tales have shifted as they have been adapted to the big and small screen.  Our discussions will be informed by critical readings in folklore and cultural studies. 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Three short (2 pages) response papers, one 3-4 page essay and one 4-5 page essay, a take-home final exam, a presentation, and class participation.  Grading will be A-F.  Due to the discussion-oriented format, class participation will be an important part of students’ final grades.

ENGL 21000-01 Literature of Horror: American Horror Stories (LA, HU)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Matusiak, 326 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 20 students

PREREQUISITE: One course in literature.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Two questions will concern us in this course: why horror? and why horror now? The first inquiry recalls the ancient philosophical “paradox of painful art”: if our instinct is to recoil in fear and revulsion from perceived monstrosity or evil in everyday life, why do we actively seek out the representation of such things in literature and other media? Explanations have been sought in psychology, biology, aesthetics, and socio-cultural studies, yet full comprehension of the phenomenon remains elusive. A second, pressing question arises from the fact that the horror genre’s mainstream appeal typically spikes whenever Americans find themselves surrounded by all-too-real crises of pain or terror. Why immerse ourselves in fictional horrors when confronted by actual endemic illness, systemic institutional violence, the specters of authoritarianism and war, economic precarity, or catastrophic climate change? To grapple with these overarching questions, students will first examine the apocalyptic Puritan and Gothic roots of American horror in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and H.P. Lovecraft. We will then trace their ramifications outwardly in the twentieth century, in post-war literature by Shirley Jackson and Harlan Ellison and the films of George A. Romero. Finally, we will explore the work of an increasingly diverse group of twenty-first-century American artists—Tananarive Due, Jordan Peele, Alyssa Wong, and Gretchen Felker-Martin to name a few—who continue to expand and enrich the genre with imaginative reflections on race, gender, and our environmental future.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: active participation; a reader-response journal; a take-home final exam.

ENGL 21900-01, -02, SHAKESPEARE: Why Shakespeare Now?

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Perspectives: HU; Themes: Identities/Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation

INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Matusiak, Muller 326

ENROLLMENT: 20 per section

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences, or sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Why study Shakespeare now? The question has never been more pressing for those who would situate the playwright and his works at the heart of English studies and other Humanities disciplines. Shakespeare was an immensely talented poet, but he died over 400 years ago. Of what use can he be in grappling with the problems that currently confront us?—rising tides of political authoritarianism and institutional corruption; economic inequality, systemic racism, xenophobia, misogynistic violence; and, critically, the ideological and epistemological polarization that prevents us from arriving at a consensus on ‘reality’ itself? If Shakespeare’s works are to have relevance in 2021, they arguably must help bring the socio-political challenges we face into clearer focus and inspire us to respond to those challenges. Whether indeed they have this capacity will be the question that guides us throughout the semester. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is necessary to succeed in this course—only enthusiasm, curiosity, and a readiness to study three artistic masterpieces—The Merchant of Venice, Othello, and The Tempest—in the contexts of Shakespeare’s time and our own.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Active participation; a reading journal; final reflective essay. Grading will be A-F. Because of the discussion-oriented format, class participation will be an important part of students’ final grades.

ENGL 21900  03, 04  Shakespeare

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION:  Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation  

INSTRUCTOR: David Kramer, Muller 322

ENROLLMENT: 20 per section.

CRN:  40406/40407

PREREQUISITE: One course in the humanities or social sciences, or sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor.  This course may be repeated for credit provided there is no duplication of the plays studied.

OBJECTIVES:   By studying comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories, the course will introduce Shakespeare’s theatre to both initiates and novices.  As we read the plays themselves we will study Shakespeare’s time, politics, religious, cultural, and scientific beliefs; what biography we possess and can conjecture; the workings of the Elizabethan theatre; Shakespeare’s poetic craft; his contemporary and subsequent reputation and that of individual plays; the vexed history of the texts themselves; and the forms and procedures of individual works as well as those of the genres of tragedy, comedy, romance, and history.  Using both the foreground of the texts and the background of context we will approach larger questions of meaning, both for Shakespeare’s time and for our own.  Substantial emphasis will be placed on the question of pleasure–why these plays pleased and still do; and on the question of cultural function, both in Shakespeare’s time and in our own.

Shakespeare set more of his plays in Italy than any of his contemporaries, and we will explore his use of Italian settings and plots through our readings of Two Gentlemen of VeronaTaming of the ShrewRomeo and JulietMuch Ado about NothingMerchant of VeniceOthello, and Winter’s Tale, works which span his career from earlies to latest.

STUDENTS: Required of English majors and minors and some Theater Arts majors, but all are welcome.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion and lectures.

REQUIREMENTS: Close reading of seven plays; completion of all assigned readings (quizzes will be given at each class); one written response each class; participation in classroom discussion; memorization of fifty lines during the course of the semester; two five-page essays; essay mid-term and final exam.

ENGL 23600 Children’s and Young Adult Graphic Novels: History and Emerging Texts 

3 CREDITS  

INSTRUCTOR: Katharine Kittredge, 317 Muller  

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section  

PREREQUISITES: none. 

Description:  This course looks at a wide range of texts, from the earliest comic images of children, to contemporary graphic novels.  We begin by looking at the late nineteenth-century Yellow Kid comics, and then spend time on the “realistic/surreal” comics of the twentieth century, including Nancy, Little LuluPeanuts and Calvin and Hobbes.  Although we will spend some time on super-hero titles like Power Pack Kids and the Runaways, our focus will primarily be on realistic titles such as American Born ChineseEl Deafo, and New Kid.  We will be considering the role that current graphic novels can play in increasing representation, promoting literacy, and encouraging empathy among children and young adults. 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Largely discussion.  

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Daily reading quizzes or weekly blog posts, mid-term paper or exam, an in-class presentation, and a longer final project that may include a creative element. 

ENGL 27800-01   Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries      

3.0 CREDITS 

INSTRUCTOR: Kasia Bartoszynska

ENROLLMENT:  22  

Jane Austen is one of the most loved authors of the long eighteenth century, but she is often read as an isolated genius, a woman whose greatness transcended her own era. In this class, we will deepen our understanding of Austen’s craft by reading her alongside other authors who were major influences on her work. In the process, we will learn about how eighteenth-century women authors thought about what life was like for women of their time—and especially, how they thought about their struggles in relation to the trans-Atlantic slave trade, during the era of abolition. As we contemplate the continuing popularity of Austen’s works, we will ponder how her novels speak to our own historical moment: how they inform the way we think about love, marriage, independence, good manners, and what the world is like.

PREREQUISITE: None.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Active class participation, regular short writing assignments, one in-class presentation, two formal essays.

English 29400 01  Slow Read:  The Iliad 

ICC DESIGNATION:  Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation  

INSTRUCTOR: Bob Sullivan, 417 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 20 students

The Iliad is a foundational text. It is also arguably the most powerful depiction of war in the Western canon. Not only has it has a profound influence on Western literature of virtually every genre, it confronts readers of every culture and era with unresolved questions, many of which continue to haunt our times, our lives, and our polities: What is the nature of war and what are its purposes? What does war do to us as people? What does winning a war really mean? What are the bonds that hold us together in a common enterprise? What makes one a good leader or a bad leader? Can we ever truly know, emphasize with, or forgive an enemy? What is this thing called glory that is attained by heroes? Can the horrors of war be depicted beautifully? Can that glory or that beauty justify the inevitable brutalization of war’s victims? We will, I promise, not provide canonical answers to these questions, but a reading of the Iliad will revive them for every careful reader. This Slow Read, then, will give us a semester long experience with Robert Fagles’ brilliant translation of the Iliad, working through its 24 “books” (they’re much more like chapters) at a sane and reflective pace. We will also honor the oral roots of its poetry by beginning each meeting with a short recitation, rhabdos in hand.

Students: Open to all students.

Format and Style: The class will be conducted as a seminar. The professor will act as a facilitator, supplying context where required, but each class meeting will be driven by discussion of the text.

Requirements:  Attendance; class participation; short response to a passage every class; five-page reaction paper. Grading: A-F based on the foregoing, with participation being paramount.

ENGL 29700 (02) Professional Development Practicum (Graphic Novels)

INSTRUCTOR: Katharine Kittredge, Muller 317, Ext. 4- 1575

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: none

OBJECTIVES: The "Graphic Novel Advisory Board" is a group of IC students who get together to review children's and teen's graphic novels. They share their findings with rural librarians and discuss ways for them to enhance their collections of graphic novels. The group puts out a monthly newsletter reviewing a wide range of graphic novels. This 1.5 credit experimental course is a great opportunity for anyone interested in education, promoting reading, or marketing/publishing graphic novels. If the pandemic allows, we also host community events promoting reading and collaborate with ITHACON to provide a whimsical reading room.

FORMAT/STYLE: Small group collaborative activities, regular writing assignments, weekend site visits.

GRADING: Performance of assigned tasks, participation in site visits, regular writing assignments, end-of-semester assessment based on personal goals (may involve event planning, reviewing, editing, or doing website enhancement), reflection on event and personal achievement.

ENGL 31100-01 DRAMATIC LITERATURE I

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Writing Intensive

INSTRUCTOR: Dan Breen, 302 Muller, ext. 4-1014

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITE: Any three courses in English, history of the theater, or introduction to the theater.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: “Comedy” and “tragedy” are ancient categories, invoked originally to describe different kinds of dramatic composition. Though this distinction remains a convenient (and relevant) one for contemporary readers and audiences, it is also the case that these seemingly simple, seemingly antithetical terms convey a range of emotion and experience that is not always easily divisible. Tragic—or potentially tragic—situations often arise in comedy, and there are moments in most tragedies at which the plays seem as though they might begin to move in more optimistic or affirming directions. This course will begin with the hypothesis that the terms “comedy” and “tragedy” describe actions taken by dramatic characters in response to crisis, and the specific consequences of those actions. As such, we will attempt to locate “comedy” and “tragedy” within fundamental elements of human experience, and examine the emotional, intellectual, and spiritual dimensions of each. We will read a selection of plays from the Classical, Renaissance English, and Restoration traditions including Sophocles’ Ajax, Plautus’ Pseudolus, Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II and Aphra Behn’s The Feigned Courtesans.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, with some context-setting lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Two 5-7-page essays, a short (2-3 pages) response paper, a take-home final exam, and class participation. Grading will be A-F. Because of the discussion-oriented format, class participation will be an important part of students’ final grades.

ENGL 31100-02  DRAMATIC LITERATURE I

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION: Writing Intensive

INSTRUCTOR: Bob Sullivan, 417 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITE:  Any three courses in English, history of the theater, or introduction to the theater

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  At the height of cultural moment we think of as Classical Greece, roughly the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, Athenian authors rigorously interrogated the most thorny questions of their times in public theatrical performances. Their plays engaged issues that were both of immediate interest to the citizens of Athens and pointed towards matters of universal importance. What is the proper relationship of humankind to the divine? Do people control their own destinies? What do we owe each other as citizens? Are men and women of the same state or status? How does social class determine one’s place in the realm of the ethical? What does war do to us as people? Who should exercise power in a polity? What is literature for? Why must we suffer? These questions were never resolved in the time of their first performances and remain stubbornly before us today.

This section of Dramatic Literature I will investigate the dialectical relationship between parochial and universal cultural production by means of an encounter with Classical drama. The course will be broken into three units. “Nasty Women” (Elektra, Bacchae, and Medea) will focus on the precarious position and status of women and, by extension, other “outsiders” in a nominally democratic polity. “Comedy Tonight” will take us to the  bizarre world of Aristophanes (Clouds, Lysistrata, and The Acharneans) and the far more familiar domestic comedies of Plautus (The Menaechmi and Pseudolus). The third and longer unit, “The Theater of War” will immerse us in the project of Bryan Doerries. Since 2008 Bryan Doerries and his Theater of War troupe have performed hundreds of times for audiences not usually thought of as participants in “high culture”; Prometheus Bound in a maximum security prison, Philoctetes in VA hospitals, Ajax in the suicide-watch ward of psychiatric hospitals, Antigone in Ferguson, Missouri in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown – using both professional actors and community members as performers. The seminar will analyze two volumes of Doerries’ translations, All That You’ve Seen Here Is God: New Versions of Ajax, Philoctetes, Women of Trachis, and Prometheus Bound, and Oedipus Trilogy: New Versions of Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone, and view a number of Theatre of War productions. Additional theoretical readings will be distributed through Canvas.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Discussion, with some context-setting lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:  Two 5-7-page essays, a short (2-3 pages) response paper, a take-home final exam, and class participation.  This course counts as fulfilling the Writing Intensive requirement for the ICC. Grading will be A-F, based on the foregoing, with a strong emphasis on participation.

ENGL 35100-01 Studies in Young Adult Literature: Girlhoods in Literature
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Katharine Kittredge, Muller 317, Ext. 4-1575
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities; junior standing.
OBJECTIVES: This course will look at the emerging and changing image of girlhoods from the 18th to the 21st century as it is reflected primarily in the texts written for an audience of young girls—in children’s books, young adult literature, and some canonical literature with strong female characters. We will be looking at the texts to gain an understanding of the evolution of children’s literature and to consider the extent to which these iconic images of girlhood reflect the ways in which the roles of women changed over the three centuries.  Possible texts might include: Goody Two Shoes, Little Women, The Little Princess, Eloise, Pippi Longstocking, Ramona, Harriet the Spy, Speak and The Hunger Games.
STUDENTS: Open to all who meet prerequisites.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion
REQUIREMENTS: Papers, journals, and projects
GRADING: Based on written work, attendance, and the quality of class participation.

ENGL 36500  LIFE, DEATH, AND AFTERLIFE IN THE FICTIONAL HOUSE

3 CREDITS

ICC DESIGNATION:  Identities; Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation  

INSTRUCTOR:  David Kramer, 322 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 20 students

PREREQUISITES:  One course in the humanities or social sciences, or sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor.

Novelistic houses contain suppressed stories that haunt their inhabitants;  hidden truths overwhelm the characters—and sometimes the readers--with long-hidden darkness.  Houses are meta-fictional records of tainted stories, and retain the supernatural record of crimes committed, or despair suffered, long after human memory has suppressed them. The fictional house frames characters’ existential struggle to free themselves from pasts that threaten to overwhelm them with terror of the suppressed truth. Ultimately, the fictional house turns out to be, as most good fictions turn out to be, explorations of human life as we all live it.  Even in the terror our readings will sometimes induce, students will find the pleasure of a tale well told.   Works will be drawn from Jane Austen, Steven King, Marilynn Robinson, Edgar Allen Poe, Andre Dubus, Evelyn Waugh, Toni Morrison, Shirley Jackson, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Charlotte Bronte.

Format and Style: Class is highly conversational.

Requirements: Two eight-page essays; reading quiz and reading response every class; class participation.

Grading: Based on attendance, participation, and completion of the above requirements. 

ENGL 37100-01 Studies in African American Literature: Global Blackness
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Derek Adams
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: 9 credits in English

ENGL 37800 TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Jen Spitzer, Muller 305, Ext. 4-7056

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: 3 courses of literature, or permission of the instructor

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers an introduction to the twentieth-century British novel. We will examine the ways in which the social, political, and cultural events of British history have shaped the production and reception of modern and contemporary British novels. Part of our task will be to put pressure on the concept of Englishness as a shifting category of identity, and to explore its relationship to other categories, such as gender, ethnicity, race, and class. Some of our guiding questions will be: How do two world wars, the expansion and contraction of empire, the decolonization of Ireland, and the rise of conservatism figure in the British novel? How do these authors work within larger international movements, such as modernism and postmodernism? And finally, how do contemporary British novels respond to the promises and disappointments of nationalism, multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism, and neoliberalism? Novels may include E.M. Forster, Howard’s End; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; Ian McEwan, Atonement; and Zadie Smith, On Beauty.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Active class participation, weekly secondary readings to complement the novels, 1-2 short reading responses, 2 formal essays.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Some lecture, mostly discussion.

ENGL 40000-01 CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH

1 CREDIT

ICC DESIGNATION: Capstone course

INSTRUCTOR: Dan Breen, 302 Muller, ext. 4-1014

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITE: Senior standing in English

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with an opportunity to reflect on their four years of study as English majors and within the ICC. The goal of the course is to complete all necessary material for the ICC e-portfolio, and for students to consider their own experiences within the context of College academic programming as well as the framework of the liberal arts more generally.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, with some context-setting lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: One 1000-word reflective essay, one shorter reflective assignment, and class participation. Grading will be P/F.

ENGL 42000-01/ ENGL 52000-01 HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alexis Becker, Muller 330

ENROLLMENT: 10 students (seminar)

PREREQUISITE: Undergrads: Four English courses, one of which must be at level 3, or permission of instructor; required of English with Teaching Option majors. Grads: required of students in the M.A.T. program in English.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The main purpose of this course is to give you a broad and deep knowledge of the linguistic concepts, histories, and social forms that inform our speech and writing. As English speakers, writers, and/or teachers, understanding how the English language works and why helps us make sense of why we read, write, speak, and think the way we do. Among other things, we will explore what distinguishes “correct” from “incorrect” usage, why we spell and pronounce words the way we do, how social and political histories inhere in our language, and why the English language is so very strange. Topics include: phonology (sounds), morphology (word-formation), and lexicon (vocabulary); grammar, syntax, and punctuation; history and development of English; variation in and varieties of English. Textbooks are This Language, A River, by K. Aaron Smith and Susan M. Kim and From Old English to Standard English: A Course Book in Language Variation Across Time by Dennis Freeborn, with other texts and media drawn from literature, popular culture, linguistics, and other sources.

COURSE FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion, in-class exercises and presentations by students, topical lectures by the instructor.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Short response pieces and other kinds of homework; presentations; quizzes and exams; research and creative projects; lively and rigorous class participation.

ENGL 46000-01,       SEMINAR IN JAMES JOYCE’S ULYSSES     HU LA 3a h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kasia Bartoszynska, 332 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 12 students

PREREQUISITE:  Any four courses in English, or permission of the instructor

COURSE DESCRIPTION.  James Joyce’s Ulysses is arguably the most important novel written in the past century.  The work is a radical departure from traditional forms and assumptions in literature, and, along with T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land,” which was also published in 1922, the novel establishes the foundation of literary modernism.  As such, the novel’s experimental structure and stream-of-consciousness narration has had a profound impact on the fiction written throughout the twentieth century.  Given the special difficulty attendant reading such a dense and experimental work, the primary purpose of this seminar is to provide and structure a close reading of the novel, one which will emphasize the integrity of the work and the multiple contexts (social, psychological, stylistical, and textual) within which and against which the novel was written.  Given its experimental nature, the novel has also lent itself to a number of innovative theoretical approaches to the nature of literature itself which will also be considered in the course of the semester.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  There will be occasional background lectures, films, and audiotapes, but the seminar will proceed on the basis of student reports and presentations focused on the eighteen different episodes of the novel.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:  Each student will be expected to give two oral presentations on aspects of the novel, one before and one after the midterm.  In addition, there will be two papers due, a five-page essay at the midterm and a 10-12 page research essay due at the end of the semester.