Title

Praneeta Mudaliar

Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies and Sciences

Praneeta Mudaliar

School: School of Humanities and Sciences

Phone: 607-274-7940

Email: pmudliar@ithaca.edu

Office: Center for Natural Sciences 252, Ithaca, NY 14850

Speciality: Environmental Policy and Governance

MY FULL FACULTY PROFILE

CV - curriculum-vitae_praneeta-mudaliar_may-31_2021_0.pdf (159.01 KB)

Education

Ph.D., Environmental and Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2016

M.Sc., Environmental Science, University of Pune, 2011

B.Sc., Biotechnology, University of Pune, 2009

My scholarship involves examining micro and macro-level power dynamics, socio-cultural inequalities, and actor interactions in the governance of shared resources through case study methods. I've conducted cross-national research on power dynamics in U.S., India, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Other projects have included examining pro-environmental behaviors among young adults in the U.S., and intergenerational climate justice. Students play an important role in my research, and have gone on to lead projects by themselves. 

My current projects involve:

1) Decolonizing Land Management in Higher Education

2) Climate Justice

3) Ostrom's Design Principles and Sacred Groves

4) Polycentric Water Systems in India and the U.S.

I'm also an external affiliated faculty member of the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University, Bloomington and a Research Fellow at the Earth System Governance (ESG) project. I tweet @Pran_eeta.

Teaching

One of my biggest joys is to teach and learn from students. My courses consider the interrelationships between environmental conservation and social justice—that conservation without social justice is meaningless. My courses emphasize the human dimensions of the environment and the reciprocal relationships between humans and the environment. Specific concepts include policy formulation and its implementation, institutional analysis, and environmental governance. In learning about these concepts, students learn that all of these are a function of diverse environmental values, world views, beliefs, attitudes, and ideologies. As such, we learn how to incorporate this diversity for furthering socio-ecological justice. 

I teach the following courses:

ENVS 110: Environmental Crisis- Causes and Solutions

ENVS 213: Environment and Natural Resource Policy of the United States

ENVS 337: Communities and Conservation

ENVS 338: Communities and Sustainable Conservation: Field Experience in West Virginia