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2021 Senior Student Show

Opening April 22!

April 22–May 18, 2021

Curated by Lily Hoffman ‘21

Featuring work by: Sophie Becraft | Ethan Benedek | Jesse Brooks | Marvin Brown | Freesia Capy Goldfarb | Olivia DiPasca | Danielle Fernandez | Gemma Gallucci | Teresa Gelsomini | Carly Rene Hough | Sanaa Idris | Alyssa Jacoby | Avi Kendrick | Tim Kennedy | Andrew Lackland | Olivia Long | Akesh Patel | Sam Rickett | Daniela Rivero | Maya Rodgers | Dean Shinner | Huilan Xu

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EXHIBITION ONLINE SHOWCASE:

https://ic2021seniorshow.wixsite.com/ic2021seniorshow

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VIRTUAL TOUR (on view through June 30, 2021):

https://poly.google.com/u/0/view/0W6sbJg6hBa

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BFA Artist Talk, Thursday, April 29, 6.00 p.m. EST

Exhibition curator Lily Hoffman will host thesis presentations of BFA students Danielle Fernandez, Dean Shinner, Olivia Long, and Andrew Lackland. Followed by a Q&A.

https://ithaca.zoom.us/j/7870495721?pwd=aS8zeThib2R0S0ozQzdodWlCZGFjUT09

Meeting ID: 787 049 5721

Passcode: 743892

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To be a part of a college community this last year, for students, staff, and faculty alike, has been continually uncertain and equally eye-opening. A pandemic continues to separate us from our families and communities, while the unjustifiable deaths of people of color around this country force us to re-evaluate historical and contemporary narratives and power dynamics. These unsettling events for some, gave way to reflective thought and for others, calls to action for personal and social change. These thoughts grew into a resounding voice that is now impossible to ignore. Even today, in our Bomber bubble, we face uncertainty about the future of our peers, mentors, and our institution. There exists a concern over forthright information and if we have enough of it. In his book Ways of Seeing John Berger says that “the relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.” Driven by that idea, Never Settle explores the complex and often unnerving space between what we see and what we know, asking viewers to get comfortable with the discomfort that exists in that now socially distant space.

The urge to create order, in all possible ways, is a natural response to chaos, and while there is calmness in order, that soon gives way to a new ache. How can we know that our own ways of looking are free of that desire for order? And how much of the truth comes from looking without that bias? All of the artists in this show have created their work within the context of this unsettling year and we should look at each piece as an attempt to shorten the distance between what we see in front of us and the truth of its maker. Never Settle acts as a call to action for those about to enter the ‘real world’ to reject the impulse to be resigned to one's current situation and to look for meaning in the space between what we see and what we yearn for. 

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Curatorial acknowledgements: 

Before starting this curatorial internship I was nervous about taking on this leadership role during a hybrid semester, but thanks to the help, insight, and support of many individuals, it was a success despite the emotional turpitude of this year. I would like to thank Mara Baldwin and Professor Jennifer Germann for their invaluable guidance during this experience, and to the faculty jurors for their oversight of the selection process. None of this would be possible without the enthusiasm and creativity of student artists or the willingness and availability of student gallery staff. I would also like to thank all of my professors in the Department of Art History for their support over the years; Brian Quan for his expert advice; my roommates Tom, Alyssa, and Mary for their patience with me this semester; and last but not least my mother, Tracy Hoffman, for her abundant and unwavering encouragement.

-Lily Hoffman ‘21