DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY
FALL  2020 COURSES (rev. 6-10-2020)

*All courses are 3 credits except where noted*
 

We have an interest in providing experience that permits students to examine social forms of life, and at the same time explore their values and beliefs. One of our interests is to help students begin to participate in the public domain. We will do this by assisting students in identifying coursework, internships, research, and other intentional experiments that can provide the fundamental theoretical and research tools for roles in intervention.

SOCI 10100-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

MWF: 11:00 - 11:50 AM (1), 1:00 – 1:50 (2)

INSTRUCTOR: Jarron Bowman
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section

PREREQUISITES:   One course in SOCI and one liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, CMST, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, GERO, HIST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, SOCI, WGST.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Explores power, institutions, and ideology. Students will examine classic texts from political sociology and reflect on foundational theoretical concepts like class, the state, social movements, authority, and knowledge. Students will then investigate how these concepts apply to contemporary political issues like inequality, polarization, disinformation, and structural racism.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Lecture and group discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  You will develop and demonstrate your sociological skills through reflection assignments, research papers, and exams, as well as quizzes and other in-class activities.

SOCI 10100-03 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

MWF: 10:00 – 10:50 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Joslyn Brenton, 112 Muller Faculty Ctr., 4-7384, jbrenton@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. In this course you will be introduced to sociological theories, methods of inquiry, and concepts that will help you cultivate a sociological perspective—the ability to see how your personal experiences are shaped by the way your society is organized. Together we will identify and examine how durable patterns in the organization of daily life give us freedom to act as we want, but also constrain our behaviors (for example, do you ever wonder why you do not see boys wearing skirts to class?). In this course we will focus on how multiple inequalities along the lines of race, class, gender, and sexuality shape our experiences and understanding of the self as well as the reproduction of inequality. It is my hope that the topics and readings discussed in this course will complicate some of your prior assumptions and knowledge about the social world, as this is part and parcel of the learning process.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, films, and small group activities, creative activities

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, group discussion, and research project.

SOCI 10100-04 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

MWF: 9:00 – 9:50 AM

INSTRUCTOR: Sergio A. Cabrera, Muller 109, 4-7968, scabrera@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS: Freshmen and sophomores only

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sociology as a field of study examines human social behavior, the causes and consequences of these social behaviors, as well as social change. Sociologists examine how social structures shape our daily interactions, while also exploring how society constructs social categories and cultural meanings. The course will introduce the relationship between sociological perspectives and the way society is structured by investigating forms of oppression, crime, race/ethnicity, work, war, intimacy, gender, inequality, health, families and "deviance." The course encourages students to be interested in and critical of the world they live in by exploring major theoretical perspectives connected to issues and activities encountered in everyday life.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Your grade will be based upon your papers, examinations and participation.

SOCI 10100-05, -06 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

MWF: 12:00 - 12:50 PM (5), 2:00 – 2:50 PM (6)

INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Sweet, Muller Faculty Ctr., 107, Ext. 4-3910,  ssweet@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS:  Freshmen and sophomores only

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sociologists examine how social arrangements shape human experience, as well as how people create order and engage in conflict. Introduction to Sociology offers foundational understandings of central sociological approaches, including terminology, theory, and methods that sociologists use to understand life worlds, social order, social conflict, and social change. The goal of this course is to open students to an awareness of insights that transcend fatalistic positions and individualistic explanations of social behavior and organization. When students leave this course, they will have a general understanding of how sociological inquiry is directed, the methods sociologists use to examine social issues, and the ways sociological perspectives inform understandings of the operations of society.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two books will be used in this course.  These texts are specifically designed to introduce the sociological imagination and guide students in understanding contemporary social issues. Additional readings are available online and there are opportunities for students to identify readings that are of particular personal interest. Class encounters are not designed to reiterate texts, but will usually expand upon issues addressed in readings.  To do well in this course, students will need to be diligent in attendance, read assignments, create journal logs, and perform well on quizzes and tests.

SOCI 20500-01 SOCIOLOGICAL INQUIRIES
MWF 12:00 – 12:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: 
Sociology Chair, Muller 110, Ext. 4-3311, sociologychair@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES:  Must be a Sociology Major.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Students will learn about primary sociological theories; basic research methods; how to ask a research question; basics of academic literature searching and reviewing; relevance of sociological reasoning and thinking.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Discussion-centric, with lectures; writing, thinking, and reading in various ways.

SOCI 20800-01, -02 SOCIAL CHANGE
TR 2:35-3:50 PM (1), 4:00 – 5:15 PM (2)

INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Thompson, Muller Faculty Ctr., 329, Ext 4-7791, athompson3@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in Sociology.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The study of society is inevitably the study of social change. Studying social change means paying attention to three distinct but interrelated dynamics. These concern the changes that are enacted by those in positions of social power, the changes that arise from tensions within a society’s structural organization, and the changes that erupt through the self-activity of the oppressed. In this course, students shall explore these dynamics as they find expression in a variety of manifestos written to address historical developments including industrialization, colonialism, the advent of consumer society, and the recent commodification of social movements. Following the genre conventions of the manifesto, students shall consider:  (i) how opportunities for change are identified; (ii) how collective actors are constituted; and (iii) how the tasks assigned to these actors are conceived in relation to both objective considerations and to other players engaged in the social field. Combining lectures, case studies, and interactive dialogue, this course requires that students commit to active participation, careful reading, and ongoing reflection.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  This course brings together lectures, discussions, written assignments, case studies, and exams. Classes scheduled on Tuesdays shall begin with a lecture devoted to the exploration of assigned readings. It is expected that students will have read the assigned material prior to the class during which it is considered. Following the lecture, students shall have the opportunity to explore how the assigned material might be used to analyze contemporary phenomena. Thursday classes shall be devoted to a student-led review of the week’s readings and to the collaborative analysis of a case study introduced at the end of Tuesday’s class.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class Participation 20%; Midterm 30%; Final Paper Proposal 20%; and Final Paper 30%

SOCI 21300-01 SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITIES
MWF 1:00 – 1:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Sociology Chair, Muller 110, Ext. 4-3311, sociologychair@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in sociology or sophomore standing
STUDENTS: Curious, hard-working, engaged social science and women’s & gender studies students will benefit most.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sexuality fascinates and vexes most of us, whether we are scholars, students, or scientists. Regardless of sexual orientation, preferences, and activities, it impacts us throughout our lives. This course will give students a unique opportunity to explore social scientific frameworks, analyses, and theories. We will examine how individuals are socially contextualized and how something as seemingly personal and individual as sexuality has a much broader framework to consider. We focus on North America, and race, class, gender, and ethnicity are woven throughout.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, structured discussions, in-class activities.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class participation and attendance, exams, brief analytical papers, critical thinking quizzes. Regular reading is crucial. Students who look for easy classes may not find this to their liking. Work and expectations will be clear to students before the drop deadline.

SOCI 21400-01, -02 DEFINITIONS OF NORMALITY

MWF: 10:00 – 10:50 AM, 11:00 – 11:50 AM

INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Dunning-Lozano, Muller Faculty Ctr., 115, Ext. 4-7490, jdunninglozano@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Using our sociological imagination we will be curious about what it means to be considered an outsider. We will think critically about the “social forces” and “coercions”, in particular historical moments, that define what is normal and what is not. In so doing we will reveal the power relations that define and control individuals and groups as “bad”, “mad”, “sad”, and “awe”-ful.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, daily engagement, facilitation of readings, discussions, analytic essays, exams.

SOCI 21700-01 MENTAL HEALTH IN HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXT 
MWF 1:00 - 1:50 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller Faculty Ctr., 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course or PSYC 10300
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores the historical and contemporary contexts of mental health and distress from both sociological and psychological perspectives. Examination of the social construction of mental health through time, and consideration of how social and cultural factors such as race, class, and gender intersect with diagnostic paradigms and clinical treatment models employed by practitioners. Cross listed as PSYC 21700. Students may not receive credit for PSYC 21700 and SOCI 21700.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussions, small group activities.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: A wide variety of learning activities, including papers, presentations, exams, and class participation.

SOCI 22000-01 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING

TR 9:25 - 10:40 AM

INSTRUCTOR: Elizabeth Bergman, Job 216, Ext. 4-3859, ebergman@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: SOCI-10100 (Introduction to Sociology) or GERO-10100 (Introduction to Gerontology).
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Upon completing the course, a student will:
1. Describe the condition of the elderly in contemporary American society, noting both attitudes toward the elderly and the objective status of the elderly, and assess the manner in which these conditions are affected by variables such as race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and culture.
2. Discuss the social implications of population aging for American society.
3. Identify the roles and importance of the elderly within the basic social institutions of the family, the economy, and the political system, and discuss the ways in which these institutions have adapted to the elderly and population aging.
4. Explain how social factors that affect successful aging are modified by such variables as social class and health status.
5. Describe the ways in which American society organizes behavior around caregiving and chronic illness, and discuss the implications for the elderly and their families.
6. Understand the historical development and status of programs and services for the elderly in the American society.
7. Apply in-class knowledge to case studies and other "real life" situations.
Please note: This course is cross-listed with GERO-22000. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI-22000 and GERO-22000.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture, videotapes, and guest speakers/panel discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two examinations, paper, brief assignments, participation.

SOCI-25300-01, -02 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS

TR 10:50 AM – 12:05 PM (1), 1:10 – 2:25 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Joslyn Brenton, Muller 115, Ext. 4-7384, jbrenton@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: One course in the social sciences
COURSE DESCRIPTION: What does it mean to be healthy? How does power shape the development of health and illness categories? In this course we will use sociological concepts and vocabulary to explore these questions. At the beginning of the course we will identify health and illness are socially produced and distributed. How can we explain, for example, why the rich tend to be relatively healthy while the poor are often sick? To answer these questions we will focus on how multiple and intersecting inequalities (e.g., race, class, gender, sexuality) shape the way people experience and negotiate health. For the remainder of the course we will focus on how ideas about health and illness are constructed, by whom, and with what consequences. The overarching goal of this course is to develop an understanding of what patterns in health and illness tell us about how societies are organized.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, group work, film, some lecture, and student-led research projects.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: A willingness to engage and become part of a learning community. This process requires your commitment to attending class, doing 100% of the reading before you come to class, and a willingness to listen, share, and develop your critical thinking skills. Students learning is gauged by reflection papers, other writing, and a final course project.

SOCI 30501-01 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL CHANGE I: UMI

TR 1:10 – 2:25 PM

INSTRUCTORS: Gustavo Licon, Egbert  344, Ext. 4-1042, glicon@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Urban Mentorship Initiative is an academic mentorship program that offers students the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary, coursework and field-based service-learning aimed at supporting disadvantaged youth’s pursuit of higher education.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grades will be assigned based on a series of reflection papers and a final group project.

SOCI 31800-01,-02 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY 

TR: 2:35 – 3:50 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Jarron Bowman
ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITES:   One course in SOCI and one liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, CMST, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, GERO, HIST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, SOCI, WGST.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Explores power, institutions, and ideology. Students will examine classic texts from political sociology and reflect on foundational theoretical concepts like class, the state, social movements, authority, and knowledge. Students will then investigate how these concepts apply to contemporary political issues like inequality, polarization, disinformation, and structural racism.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Lecture and group discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  You will develop and demonstrate your command of course concepts through research papers; exams; quizzes; and other in-class activities.

SOCI 32600-01 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

TR: 1:10 – 2:25 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Thompson, Muller 329, Ext. 4-7791, athompson3@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Two (2) Level 2 Courses in Sociology or Related Field

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Through this course, students shall become familiar with and critically engage key concepts and themes in social movement studies. After reviewing a range of theoretical traditions and developing an awareness of the discipline, students will consider the central role that Black freedom struggles have played in American history and in the formation of the modern American social movements. Designed as an interactive seminar in which students are encouraged to experiment with the practical application of the material they encounter, this course requires careful reading, writing, and reflection.  Through a critical engagement with course readings, active participation in weekly seminars, and class assignments, students will:
• Cultivate a familiarity with and understanding of key themes and concepts in the field of social movement studies.
• Develop an awareness of the historic role played by Black freedom struggles in the formation of modern American social movements.
• Learn to analyze social movements through comparative analysis and by drawing on the theoretical and practical tools developed by scholars in the field.
• Conduct original research into a contemporary social movement.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Each week's first class will be devoted to a lecture covering assigned readings. During each week's second class, after a student-led review of lecture material, students will analyze a social movement artifact by considering how the themes, theories, research methods, or case studies introduced in that week’s readings might be used to further our understanding. Active student participation in discussion is necessary during both the lecture and seminar discussion sessions. A willingness to take risks and improvise will therefore be considered an asset!

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class Participation 20% -Students will be evaluated not solely on the basis of their regular attendance, which is expected, but on the basis of their active participation in classroom discussion as well. Receiving full marks requires that students are prepared each week to participate in the lecture review and to identify and analyze that week’s case study artifact.
Midterm 30%-The midterm will cover material from the first half of the course. Drawing on a variety of assessment tools, the Midterm will require that students are able to identify and apply key themes in social movement studies.
Final Paper Proposal 20%-In preparation for their Final Paper, students will produce a Final Paper Proposal that clearly outlines 1) what course material they will be drawing upon, 2) what social movement they will be considering and how they plan to analyze it, and 3) what the significance of their findings might be. 
Final Paper 30%-In composing their Final Paper, students may draw on material covered at any point during the course. The paper will 1) describe a current social movement that can be analyzed using course material, 2) describe how the tools presented in course readings shall be used to analyze that movement, and 3) analyze the movement and 4) speculate about the broader implications of the analysis for the field of social movement studies.

SOCI 33501-01 ST: SEXUALITY & HEALTH

M 4:00 - 6:40 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Luca Maurer, Hammond Health Ctr., B116, Ext. 4-7394, lmaurer@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; two additional social science courses.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course explores the intersections of sexuality and health and focuses on both as social concepts. We will investigate the manner in which sexuality and health are shaped by individual, social and cultural factors and how ideas about our bodies and our sexuality are related to ideas about our health.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  The course includes a wide variety of learning opportunities, including multidisciplinary readings, experiential learning activities, summative reflections, and other learning modalities, and is taught in an intersectional manner.      

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Based upon a project, a paper, exams, a group project, class participation, and other assignments.

SOCI 33508-01 ST: RACE & CRIME

TR: 2:35 – 3:50 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Cedrick-Michael Simmons

ENROLLMENT: 20 students per section

PREREQUISITES:   Introduction to Sociology and one other social science course is preferred.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  What is the relationship between race and crime? This course compares and contrasts theories sociologists can use to answer this question. In particular, we will focus on the debates surrounding the "racial," structural, and institutional explanations for the racial disparities in arrests and incarceration of social actors in the United States. In addition, we will critically evaluate the use of diversity management practices (i.e. diversity trainings) to address the aforementioned racial disparities. 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  A mixture of lecture and seminar.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Participation and attendance (20%), student-led discussions of readings (15%), critical thinking quizzes (15%), several short writing assignments (50% total). Readings and assignments may be subject to change due to a decision by the instructor and/or approval by the majority of course participants.  

SOCI 35500-01, -02 QUANTITATIVE METHODS

TR: 9:25 – 10:40 AM (01), 10:50 AM – 12:05 PM (02)

INSTRUCTOR:  Sergio Cabrera, Muller Faculty Ctr., 109, Ext. 4-7968, scabrera@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT:  20

PREREQUISITES:  Prerequisites: SOCI 20500 or the one credit course in GERONTOLOGY introducing students to research methods.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Topics in this course include the logic of quantitative research, causation, variables and variable construction, questionnaire design, sampling, and univariate and multivariate analysis. Students are required to design and distribute a questionnaire, analyze data, and prepare and present a formal research report.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  10% Literature Review; 10% Full Research Proposal; 5% Preliminary Analysis; and 25% Final Report

SOCI 42000-01 SCHOLARSHIP OF & BY WOMEN OF COLOR
TR 2:35-3:50

INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez, Egbert Hall 347, Ext. 4-3921, bgonzalez@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: One course in the social sciences or sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an introduction to concepts, theories, and current research on race & ethnicity on the United States. We will approach the subject through various perspectives including assimilations and pluralist. Race & ethnicity will be examined as dimensions of social stratification and social control. We will examine, analyze and challenge concepts, such as: prejudice, discrimination, institutional racism, internal colonization and ethnic identity.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussions, films.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Exams & Papers

SOCI 43504-01 ST: GLOBAL CAPITALISM, CRISIS & POSSIBILITY

MW 2:00 – 3:15 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Alicia Swords, Muller Faculty Center, Ext. 4-1209, aswords@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in Sociology.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course brings the tools of sociology to study global capitalism. Based on close readings of political economists, scholars of development and social movements, we examine the development and dynamics of the current economic system, including its crises and possibilities for social change. Case studies and multimedia sources draw especially from the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. Students examine social and economic crises, contradictions and possibilities in different localities.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Seminar and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Attendance; preparation for discussion; regular writing assignments; and research project.

SOCI 43501-01 SURVEILLANCE & SOCIETY

TR 4:00 – 6:40

INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Dunning-Lozano, Muller Faculty Ctr. 115, Ext. 4-7490, jdunninglozano@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: One 100 level sociology course; 3 courses in the social sciences with at least 1 at level 3

STUDENTS: Junior standing or above
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the complex ways that technologies and societies interact to produce security, fear, power, and social control. Course topics include: surveillance as a tool for social control; surveillance technologies in the workplace, schools, on-line, and in the domestic sphere; biometric technologies; and the hypervisibility of certain racialized, classed, gendered or “othered” bodies. Course texts will draw from the disciplines of sociology, race and ethnic studies, geography, and criminology. We will also utilize the mediums of film, reality TV, and social media to examine perceptions of safety, danger, and the normalization of surveillance technologies in our day-to-day lives.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture/multimedia

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Term paper, engagement with course readings, and class

SOCI 43507-01 ST: QUEER THEORY

W: 4:00 – 6:40 PM

INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Thompson, Muller 329, Ext. 4-7791, athompson3@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: Two (2) Level 3 Courses in Sociology or Related Field

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Through this survey course, students shall become familiar with and critically engage key submissions to the queer theory canon. Considering a range of theoretical perspectives and covering themes including embodiment, sexuality, time, and space, assigned readings will provide students with a variety of queer perspectives from which to analyze contemporary social realities. Designed as an interactive seminar in which students are encouraged to experiment with the practical application of the material they encounter, this course requires careful reading, writing, and reflection.  Through a critical engagement with course readings, active participation in weekly seminars, and class assignments, students will:
• Cultivate an awareness of how queer theory developed as a scholarly discipline in response to changing social, cultural, and political circumstances, and how it critically incorporated other traditions like poststructuralism and psychoanalysis.
• Learn to analyze contemporary social events from a queer theory perspective by drawing on the theoretical and practical tools developed by scholars in the field.
• Hone their thinking and writing skills by applying the insights of queer theory to the analysis of contemporary events.
• Develop confidence analyzing “difficult” texts through careful exegetical reading.                              COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Each week's first class will be devoted to a lecture covering assigned readings. During each week's second class, students will lead seminar discussions by elaborating how the themes, theories, or research methods introduced in that week’s readings might be used to further our understanding of a social event they’ve chosen to analyze. Active student participation in discussion is necessary during both the lecture and seminar discussion sessions.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class Participation 20%-Students will be evaluated not solely on the basis of their regular attendance, which is expected, but on the basis of their active participation in classroom discussion as well.
Student Presentations 30%-Throughout the semester, students will lead the Friday seminar by 1) reviewing the contributions made by the readings from that week, 2) introducing a social event that can be productively analyzed using those contributions, 3) proposing how such an analysis might be conducted and what the findings might be, 4) evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of such an analysis, and 5) engaging the class in discussion to further contribute to the process of analysis.
Final Paper Proposal 20%-In preparation for their Final Paper, students will produce a Final Paper Proposal that clearly outlines 1) what course material they will be drawing upon, 2) what social event they will be considering and how they plan to analyze it, and 3) what the significance of their findings might be.
Final Paper 30%-In composing their Final Paper, students may draw on material covered at any point during the course. The paper will 1) describe a current event in New York that can be analyzed from the standpoint of queer theory, 2) describe how the tools presented in course readings shall be used to analyze these dynamics, and 3) analyze the event and speculate about broader implications of the analysis.

SOCI 44500-01 TUTORIAL: SEXUALITY & GENDER RESEARCH

MW: 2:00 – 3:15 PM

ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; three additional courses in sociology; permission of instructor.

NOTE: The course is Writing Intensive. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course is designed to introduce students to research that utilizes gender and sexuality as foundational variables.  Student will learn how to conduct either their own research or work in teams to do so.  Course products include an original research project, designed and carried out individually.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  The course is a combination of independent study and group and team work.  We will meet to discuss all aspects of sociological gender and sexuality research.  Student teams will meet outside of class as well.  Individual meetings with the professor will also be necessary.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Students will need to design and complete – alone or in teams – a gender plus sexuality research project.  Students will need to be diligent and disciplined, ready to work, read, and learn; able to do independent and collective work. Experience in research methods not needed but willingness to learn is.
 

SOCI 49800-01  INTERNSHIP IN SOCIOLOGY COURSE
(Credits vary)

M 3:00-3:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller Faculty Ctr. 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: Counseling minors and permission of instructor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students in this course arrange for internships in local agencies. Students meet as a group each week to share their experiences and report on their progress. Students meet individually with the course professor on a regular basis to discuss their work. Internship sites should be obtained before the end of the fall semester.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Internship in local agency, including some direct work with clients, weekly internship seminar
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation in internship setting and during seminar, weekly journaling, reflective paper