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4.12 Evaluation of Faculty

4.12 Evaluation of Faculty

4.12.1 General Information Regarding Evaluation

  1. All faculty who will be offered appointment for the next academic year must receive annual evaluations for salary. These evaluations must consider teaching, scholarly/professional activity, and service. In the case of a tenure-eligible faculty member, these evaluations must be completed on or before March 1 in the faculty member's first year of appointment. These evaluations will be conducted by chairs, unless otherwise provided in approved planning unit or school procedures. Approved procedures should detail what materials are to be used for the evaluation and the steps in the evaluation.
     
  2. If an annual evaluation of a tenured faculty member manifests the existence of serious instructional deficiencies which are deemed likely to persist, then further evaluation as described in section 4.14 must be conducted. This is the only circumstance in which such evaluation will be initiated.
     
  3. All faculty receive a cumulative written evaluation at least once every seven years. The value of the cumulative evaluation is that it provides the perspective of several years. For a tenured faculty member the sole purpose of this evaluation is to aid in maintaining and enhancing the faculty member's overall excellence as a faculty member. In particular, for a tenured faculty member, the results of the cumulative evaluation will be given only to the faculty member. Cumulative evaluations should be conducted by a group of the faculty member's colleagues as specified in approved planning unit or school procedures. These approved planning unit or school procedures should specify what materials will be used in the evaluation, by what procedures, and with what frequency the evaluation will be conducted. For example, the cumulative written evaluation could incorporate evaluations and largely rely on a summary of them. Moreover, cumulative evaluations might rely on written statements by the faculty member being evaluated or on written statements by peers, the chair, and/or the dean. An evaluation of teaching must not rely exclusively on student statements and/or summaries of student statement. For tenure-eligible faculty, the more extensive evaluation for tenure or renewal of appointment will replace a cumulative evaluation; for non-tenure-eligible, adjunct, and tenured faculty, the more extensive evaluation for promotion will replace a cumulative evaluation.
     
  4. An individual in a tenure-eligible position may present a written request to the chair or dean at any time asking that a written evaluation of the individual's progress be conducted by the chair, by an appropriate personnel committee, or by the dean. The results of the evaluation will be made available to the faculty member by the end of the following semester.
     

4.12.2 Policies and Procedures Regarding Faculty Appointments, Evaluation, Tenure and Promotion

Each planning unit or school develops appropriate and detailed personnel policies, standards, and procedures for appointment of faculty, reappointment of faculty, evaluation of faculty, and consideration of faculty for tenure and promotion. In those schools in which different planning units develop separate personnel policies, standards, and procedures, the school's faculty selects a committee which reviews those planning unit personnel policies, standards, and procedures and approves them, provided they are in compliance with the Ithaca College Policy Manual, the school's personnel policies, standards, and procedures, and provided they are fair and appropriate across the school. All planning unit and school personnel policies, standards, and procedures require the approval of the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs and the president. In reviewing such personnel policies, standards, and procedures, the provost and president will ensure that they are in compliance with the Ithaca College Policy Manual and are fair and appropriate across the College. In addition, the provost may call upon the All-College Faculty Tenure and Promotion Committee or a committee created by Faculty Council for the purpose of assisting in the review of planning unit and school personnel policies, standards, and procedures.

4.12.3 Major Formal Evaluations of Tenure-Eligible Faculty

Major formal evaluations for tenure-eligible faculty normally occur in the second and fourth tenure-eligible years of employment pursuant to a tenure-eligible notice appointment. The tenure review normally occurs in the sixth year. When a faculty member comes to the College with credit for prior experience, the major formal review takes place at the mid-point of the stipulated tenure-eligible period. Exceptions to the above timetables providing more or less frequent formal reviews must be proposed by the planning unit and approved by the dean and provost & senior vice president for academic affairs. Unless there are serious deficiencies, other tenure-eligible reviews should be carried out primarily by the chair and/or dean.

In preparing and presenting a personnel file for formal review, a tenure-eligible faculty member and the faculty member's colleagues must follow the Procedures for File Preparation and Presentation. Copies of this document are available in the offices of the deans and the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs at https://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol4/docs/procedures_for_file_prep.pdf.  Planning unit or school guidelines may be substituted for these procedures if they are approved by the dean and provost & senior vice president for academic affairs as part of the personnel policies and procedures for that planning unit or school. Individual variations from the procedures are only permitted when approved by the planning unit, dean, and provost. If the tenure-eligible faculty member's file departs otherwise from the procedures, any committee or individual in the review process may refuse to consider the file until it conforms with the procedures.

4.12.4 Procedures for Major Formal Evaluations of Tenure-Eligible Faculty

  1. A planning unit or school personnel committee evaluates the performance of each tenure-eligible faculty member and makes recommendations with justifications (through the planning unit when appropriate) to the dean (with a copy to the faculty member). Before taking formal action, the planning unit or school personnel committee (and the entire planning unit, when appropriate) will offer to meet with the faculty member. If provided in the approved planning unit or school procedures, the chair will also evaluate the tenure-eligible faculty member and make a recommendation with justifications to the dean (with a copy to the faculty member). The chair who makes a separate and independent recommendation of the faculty member participates in planning unit or school tenure and promotion committees in accordance with planning unit or school guidelines. The dean must not communicate the dean's judgment on reappointment to the personnel committee until the committee submits its own recommendation.
     
  2. Before making a recommendation, the dean must give the faculty member an opportunity to express the faculty member's views concerning the aforementioned recommendation.
     
  3. When the dean is satisfied that the evaluations have been thoroughly conducted and that the recommendations are soundly based, the dean forwards the file along with the dean's recommendation with justifications to the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs (with a copy to the faculty member). If the dean is not satisfied that an evaluation has been thoroughly conducted and that the recommendation is soundly based, the dean must return the recommendation with suggestions to the personnel committee or chair from which it originated. If, after thorough consideration, the personnel committee or chair does not accept the dean's suggestions, the dean must forward all recommendations the dean has received, along with the dean's own recommendation with justifications, to the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs for final review.
     
  4. The provost & senior vice president for academic affairs and the president review the faculty's and dean's recommendations with their accompanying justification.
     
  5. Final decisions concerning all reappointments are made by the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs and the president, in accordance with the planning unit staffing plans. Upon completion of the major formal review process, the dean communicates the results of the review in writing to the faculty member. This communication also specifies the timetable and describes the evaluative process leading to the next major formal review.

4.12.5 Confidentiality

Confidentiality of oral communications promotes candor and honesty among faculty and administrators involved with the review of candidates for reappointment. Therefore, all oral statements made by members of personnel committees and by administrators during formal deliberations about reappointment, whether at department, planning unit, school, or College levels are and shall remain confidential.

Similarly, professional propriety requires sensitivity to the value of and need for confidentiality in the handling of formal written communications in the review process. However, with the exception of documents which the faculty member has stipulated to remain confidential, the contents of the file are open for review by the faculty member at any stage of the review process. Once the file has left the hands of the faculty member, the file may not be physically removed by the faculty member from the office of the person currently reviewing the file. A faculty member who wishes to review the file will contact the person currently reviewing the file to make the appropriate arrangements.

4.12.6 Criteria for Major Formal Evaluations of Tenure-Eligible Faculty

As approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/20/2014.

  1. In the second-year evaluation, there must be evidence that the terminal degree or the professional equivalent will be completed by the end of the third year, unless otherwise specified in the original letter of appointment. Peer evaluations of teaching and of student statements must demonstrate the potential for making significant progress toward the attainment of teaching excellence by the fourth year.
  2. Under normal circumstances, the fourth year evaluation must show:
    1. Significant progress toward the attainment of teaching excellence (based on peer evaluations of teaching and of student statements and other evidence as specified in approved procedures);
    2. Scholarship and/or appropriate professional activity in addition to that leading to the terminal degree;
    3. Service to the College and to the profession.
  3. Under normal circumstances, the formal mid-point review of a faculty member who comes to the College with credit for prior experience must show:
    1. Significant progress toward the attainment of teaching excellence (based on peer evaluations of teaching and of student statements and other evidence as specified in approved procedures);
    2. Scholarship and/or appropriate professional activity in addition to that leading to the terminal degree;
    3. Service to the College and to the academic community.

4.12.7 Teaching, Scholarship/Professional Activity, Service

The primary responsibility of faculty at the College is teaching. The second important responsibility is scholarship and/or professional activity. Service to the institution is another important faculty responsibility. The goal of the faculty is overall excellence in the performance of these responsibilities.

4.12.7.1 Teaching

Teaching is interpreted in its broadest sense to include academic guidance and intellectual motivation as well as classroom, laboratory, and studio instruction.

The characteristics of an excellent teacher are difficult to define as teachers must adapt to the particular subject matter, educational objectives, and environment. With those caveats in mind, the following description is presented in order to provide guidance as to some of the characteristics of an excellent teacher.

An excellent teacher demonstrates mastery of the following: command of the subject, an analytical approach to the material, recognition and contrast of variant interpretations of the data where appropriate, consideration of current work in the field, and ability to show the relationship between the particular subject and other areas of knowledge. The excellent teacher clearly explains expectations and subject matter, recognizes the students' level of comprehension, defines the objectives; summarizes major points, organizes the material logically, and emphasizes crucial ideas; encourages student participation, welcomes interaction with students, and is sensitive to the response of the class; deals ethically with students and seeks rapport with them; motivates and challenges students, is dedicated to the subject and the teaching profession, displays self-confidence, and communicates a sense of excitement for the pursuit of knowledge.

4.12.7.1.1 Advising Students

As revised by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/24/2005.

Academic advising is an important faculty responsibility. It includes, but is not limited to, helping students assess academic strengths and weaknesses, explore intellectual and career interests and goals, develop plans for a coherent academic program, monitor progress toward their degrees, evaluate their academic options, and understand the consequences of their decision.

Academic advising has both developmental and prescriptive aspects. Developmental advising assists students in making the transition to higher education, growing as students during college years, and making the transition from college to the world of work and/or continuing education. Prescriptive advising helps students understand the requirements of academic programs and the academic regulations of the College so they can take advantage of the many educational opportunities offered at Ithaca. Academic advisors help students assume responsibility for their educational decision-making and recognize that there are other professionals on campus from whom they can obtain academic advice, counsel, assistance, and support.

The excellent academic advisor is accessible to students and is an effective listener and communicator. He or she is also knowledgeable about academic programs, regulations, and resources; is concerned about student performance and development; and is aware of career opportunities and services. The excellent academic advisor provides sufficient time for advising, maintains confidentiality in the advising relationship, and refers students to other resources as appropriate.

4.12.7.2 Scholarly Research and Creative Work

As approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/20/2014.

As teachers, scholars, and artists, faculty are expected to contribute to the fields of knowledge within their expertise. Scholarship and professional activity are manifested in many ways - for example, by research, paper presentations, publications, editorships, creative performance and exhibits, and by continued study in the discipline.

The specific form and intensity of scholarly activity within the College appropriately varies between academic departments due to inherent differences among the disciplines.

Scholarship can take many forms. It includes, for example, articles in journals, research monographs, scholarly books, treatises, chapters in larger works, papers presented at academic meetings, and published instructional materials. In addition to traditional written works, scholarship may encompass, in particular disciplines, such types of intellectual expression as stage productions, musical performances, art exhibits, mathematical and scientific formulas, and software creation. Despite their myriad forms, works of scholarship share common characteristics which make it possible both to identify basic types of scholarship and to assess the value of works within those categories. For the purpose of promoting quality scholarship at the College, a framework consisting of types of scholarship and assessment criteria is set forth below in sections 4.12.7.2.1 and 4.12.7.2.2. The content of those sections forms the basis for the articulation by the various academic departments of more specific expectations relating to scholarly productivity of faculty members within those academic units that are discussed in section 4.12.7.2.3. In turn, those interpretations of the scholarship requirement define the standards against which a faculty member's scholarly productivity is to be measured during evaluations for retention and promotion.

4.12.7.2.1 Types of Scholarship

The College identifies at least five basic types of scholarship as follows

  1. The Scholarship of Discovery encompasses those scholarly activities which extend the stock of human knowledge through the discovery or collection of new information. Such scholarship seeks to confront the unknown and typically exhibits a dedication to free inquiry, disciplined investigation, and the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake. The Scholarship of Discovery includes, but is not limited to, what is sometimes referred to as basic or original research.
     
  2. The Scholarship of Integration encompasses scholarly activities which are primarily interdisciplinary or interpretive in nature. Such scholarship seeks to better understand existing knowledge by making connections across disciplines, illuminating data in a revealing manner, drawing together isolated factors, or placing known information into broader contexts. It synthesizes, interprets, and connects the findings in a way that brings new meaning to those facts.
     
  3. The Scholarship of Application encompasses scholarly activities which seek to relate the knowledge in one's field to the affairs of society. Such scholarship moves toward engagement beyond academia in a variety of ways, such as by using social problems as the agenda for scholarly investigation, drawing upon existing knowledge for the purpose of crafting solutions to social problems, or making information or ideas accessible to the public.
     
  4. The Scholarship of Teaching encompasses scholarly activities which are directly related to pedagogical practices. Such scholarship seeks to improve the teaching and advising of students through discovery, evaluation, and transmission of information about the learning process.
     
  5. The Scholarship of Artistic Endeavor encompasses scholarly activities which are directly related to the creative process, especially in the fine or applied arts. Such scholarship may seek to bring about new artistic creations or to present existing works.

The five categories defined above do not embrace the entire range of valuable scholarship. Rather, the categories denote five areas of scholarly activity that the College has chosen to recognize as particularly significant. By defining these categories, the College makes it possible for faculty members and individual academic departments to identify more clearly the role of scholarship at the College.

Some works of scholarship have attributes that legitimately fall within more than one of the five stated categories. Consequently, it is often difficult to fairly categorize a work in the absence of full details about its content. Mindful of that limitation, the following non-exhaustive list is illustrative of works within the five categories:

  1. Examples of the Scholarship of Discovery may be drawn from the sciences, such as the development of new materials and drugs, the discovery of unknown physical phenomena, and the identification of laws governing physics or mathematics. Across the disciplines, many types of empirical research, involving the use of quantitative techniques from the social sciences, fall within the Scholarship of Discovery. Work that is so highly original that it cannot fairly be regarded as merely interpretive, interdisciplinary, or an extension of the work of others may constitute the Scholarship of Discovery.
     
  2. Interdisciplinary works, such as those which use economic or psychological analysis, may qualify as Scholarship of Integration. The same is true of evaluative and interpretive works, such as review essays, which probe the merits of another's work from a particular viewpoint, such as a religious, political, or gender-based perspective.
     
  3. Examples of the Scholarship of Application include such diverse forms of scholarship as drafts of model legislation; articles and books examining the legal, economic, or ethical implications of new social phenomena; editorials and opinion pieces involving issues in one's discipline; and certain types of research in the applied sciences.
     
  4. Examples of the Scholarship of Teaching include publications about pedagogy and methodology, development and publication of instructional materials, the conduct of workshops on innovative teaching methods, and the creation of computer exercises in areas relating to one's discipline.
     
  5. Examples of the Scholarship of Artistic Endeavor include stage presentations (both drama and music), exhibitions, new editions of music or visual art, musical performances, art exhibits, and the creation of new art forms or new techniques within an art form.

The Scholarship of Application partially overlaps with the requirement of service. For example, in cases where public service involves the direct application of knowledge in one's field to the affairs of society, the work counts toward satisfaction of both the service and scholarship requirements for retention, promotion, and salary increases. However, the same is not true of all forms of service. There is a difference, for example, between carrying one's share of the administrative burdens of the College and participating in projects that require the application of knowledge from one's field. To be considered scholarship, service activities must be tied directly to one's discipline and require the use of knowledge of the discipline in the service of the College or profession.

Similarly, the Scholarship of Teaching must be distinguished from teaching itself. The Scholarship of Teaching involves the disciplined discovery, evaluation, and transmission of information about the learning process. Teaching, in contrast, involves the application of that information through actual instruction.

4.12.7.2.2 Assessment of Scholarship

The evaluation of scholarship includes, but is not necessarily limited to, whether the work is well expressed, innovative, comprehensive, and visible.

4.12.7.2.3 Standards Interpreting the Scholarship Requirement

The faculty members of each school or planning unit and the College shall define the College's scholarship requirement.

Upon initial adoption or revision by the provost & senior vice president for academic affairs, the standards adopted by individual departments shall be incorporated into Volume VI of this Ithaca College Policy Manual.

4.12.7.3 Service

This service includes both ad hoc and formal activities within the department, planning unit, school, and College. In addition, faculty may choose to serve in external professional organizations.

4.12.7.3.1 Service to the Department, Planning Unit, and/or School

Both ad hoc and formal activities are routinely expected of all faculty within a department, planning unit, and/or school. Ad hoc activities may include such duties as being available for interviews with prospective students and their parents, being available to alumni and alumnae, and working at recruitment programs and at registration. Formal activities include, but are not limited to, participation in scheduled department, planning unit, and school meetings and participation on departmental, planning unit, and school committees.

4.12.7.3.2 Service to the College

All faculty are expected to attend Commencement, formal convocations of the College, and scheduled all-College faculty meetings. The standing committees of the College are a very important part of faculty responsibility, and availability for service on these standing committees and on all-College ad hoc committees is expected of all faculty. No faculty member shall be expected to serve on more than one all-College standing committee at a time.

4.12.7.3.3 Service to the Profession

As approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/20/2014.

Subject to planning unit and school standards, service to the profession may be considered as a partial substitute for service to the department, planning unit, school, and College. Professional service includes, for example, holding office in a professional organization, refereeing grant proposals for an external agency, or professional service in agencies or organizations.

4.12.7.4 Student Evaluation

The College's policy requires periodic student evaluations of all faculty members. Evaluations are conducted at regular intervals each year.

4.12.8 Documentation

Regardless of the type of review undertaken (annual merit review, tenure and promotion review, post tenure review), it is important that each be based on solid, consistent, and clear documentation. It is incumbent upon each faculty member to document teaching, scholarship, and service activities, continuing professional development, honors, and awards. Documentation of the evaluation criteria listed below may include but should not be limited to the following:

  1. Self-evaluation;
  2. Peer evaluations;
  3. Student evaluations;
  4. A review of course syllabi by peers;
  5. Further course work or other continuing education in one's field;
  6. Participation in seminars or workshops designed to improve teaching or advising skills;
  7. Awards, fellowships, grants, etc.;
  8. Election to a scholarly or professional post;
  9. Letters of reference from organizations, student groups, and individuals; and
  10. Publications in refereed journals; and
  11. Evaluations by applicable dean.

4.12.9 Evaluation of Non Tenure-Eligible Notice Faculty

As approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/20/2014.

Policies and procedures pertaining to NTEN faculty appointment renewal are those established by planning unit or school bylaws.  Faculty members on NTEN appointments seeking clarification on their planning unit’s appointment renewal procedures should consult with their personnel committee chairperson and/or dean.

4.12.10 Evaluation of Part-Time Per-Course and Adjunct Faculty

As approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees 2/20/2014.

Part-time per-course and adjunct faculty members must excel in teaching.  Evaluations of such a faculty member’s teaching are to be conducted at regular intervals each year.  The applicable chair or dean is responsible for regularly monitoring the quality of teaching by part-time per-course and adjunct faculty members.

Last Updated: February 26, 2014