Department of Communication Studies – Spring 2020

 

 

Three programs are offered through the Department of Communication Studies:

Communication Studies-CMST: a major and a minor. Students are admitted following an interview with the department chairperson.

Culture and Communication-CLTC: a major. Students are admitted following an interview with the program coordinator.

 

The BACHELOR OF ARTS in Communication Studies and the BACHELOR OF ARTS in Culture and Communication are recommended for students who want a broad liberal arts background as preparation for possible careers in public relations, business, law, education, government, social services, and other professions, or for graduate study.

 

All courses in the area of Communication Studies are open to non-majors, although some upper level courses have prerequisites.

 

 

Culture and Communication Courses

 

CLTC 10000-01 Introduction Culture and Communication (LA)

This course fulfills the “diversity” attribute for the ICC.

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: E. Christine Thompson, Rothschild 107, Ext. 4-7115

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the contribution from various perspectives within the Communication Studies tradition toward studying the relationship between culture and communication. To this end, students will be exposed to areas of inquiry complimenting the rise of cosmopolitanism. With specificity in mind, this course will cover such relationships as, (1) cultural forces and trends producing and defining cosmopolitanism (2) the cultural, racial and socio-political aspects present within cosmopolitan studies and (3) how these forces and trends are challenging dominant models of knowledge.

Attributes: DV, LMSP, LSCO (F, S)

 

CLTC 10000-02 Introduction Culture and Communication (LA)

This course fulfills the “diversity” attribute for the ICC.

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Christopher House, Muller 429, Ext. 4-3216

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the contribution from various perspectives within the Communication Studies tradition toward studying the relationship between culture and communication. To this end, students will be exposed to areas of inquiry complimenting the rise of cosmopolitanism. With specificity in mind, this course will cover such relationships as, (1) cultural forces and trends producing and defining cosmopolitanism (2) the cultural, racial and socio-political aspects present within cosmopolitan studies and (3) how these forces and trends are challenging dominant models of knowledge.

Attributes: DV, LMSP, LSCO (F, S)

 

Communication Studies Courses

 

CMST 11000-01 & 02 sections Public Communication (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTORS: Scott Thomson, Job 211, Ext. 4-3670

ENROLLMENT: 18 each section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: To improve students' ability to organize thought for communicative purposes; to develop students' confidence, spontaneity, and extemporaneous style in one-to-many oral communication situations; to encourage students’ development and use of logical argument supported by evidence in persuasive communication attempts both inside and outside the classroom setting; to increase students' sensitivity to appropriate and inappropriate language use, and nonverbal communication stimuli; to assist students’ choice of appropriate message content, organization and style for a variety of audience situations; to stimulate development of critical listening skills for use inside and outside the classroom as communication receiver-consumer.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Approximately 50% class time is lecture discussion; 50% class time is speech making and critical listening.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Attendance is required. Students must participate in discussion, speaking, and critical listening. Speeches and outlines. Other requirements to be announced.

Attributes: 3A, CCCS, ESTS, HU (F-S, Y)

 

CMST 11500-all sections Business and Professional Communications (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTORS:

Section 01, 02, 03: Ann Byrne, JOB 213, Ext. 4-1067

Section 04, 05, 06: E. Christine Thompson, Rothschild Pl. 107, Ext. 4-7115

Section 07, 08: David Smith, Rothschild Pl. 126, Ext. 4-5794

ENROLLMENT: 20 each section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students who have an interest in developing their professional skills.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will be provided with opportunities to develop their skills at business and professional communication in a variety of forms. Specifically, they will learn to effectively prepare and deliver oral presentations, work in small groups, participate in interviews as either the interviewer or interviewee, listen actively and critically to the presentations of others, and maintain good interpersonal relationships in the workplace. Some instruction may also be provided in writing effective résumés and business letters.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Student presentations, lectures, in-class discussions and exercises.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Presentations, exams, attendance and participation.

Attributes: CCCS, ESTS, HU (F-S, Y)

 

CMST 12000-01 Communication, Culture and Rhetoric (LA)

This course fulfills the Humanities perspective with the Identities Theme requirement for the ICC.

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Robert Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3930

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: None.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, we explore the idea that popular culture—the everyday messages to which the public is exposed, especially through mass media—is the dominant rhetorical, i.e., persuasive, influence in most people’s lives today. Thus, we interrogate the rhetorical instruments or means by which we are influenced by popular culture, as we study the dimensions of our lives that are most affected, i.e., our social identities. Specifically, this course includes a close examination of the ways communicative processes (e.g., language, media, discourse) are used to construct dominant and non-dominant social identities, e.g., race, class, gender, sexuality, and how those identities are thus reproduced, internalized, contested and/or appropriated by society. This course provides students with a theoretical vocabulary for critically evaluating public, mediated, and culture-centered communication. The critical vocabulary, theories, and methods of criticism that organize this course are drawn from Media-centered, Marxist, Narrative/Dramatistic, Psychoanalytic, and Feminist schools of thought. Taught from a humanities perspective, the main goal of this course is to inform and to make students aware of the rhetorical influences in their everyday life and how those influences come to bear on the ways we perform our social identities.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, participation, regular quizzes.

Attributers: 1, HM, HU, LMSP, LSCO, TIDE (F, Y)

 

CMST 12400-01 Courtrooms and Communication (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Angela Rulffes, Muller 415, Ext. 4-3542

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITE: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Courtrooms and Communication provides an active introduction to law and advocacy as human, not technical, phenomena. The course is conducted around in-class discussions, readings and media, and participation in mock trials. The key concepts stressed in this course are advocacy, evidence, burdens of proof, judgment, conduct of trial, legal proceedings as theater, juries as decision making groups, the ethical responsibilities of advocates, and legal reasoning. Courtrooms and Communication is a required course in the Legal Studies Major.

Attributes: 1, HU (F, Y)

 

CMST 13200-01, 02 Storytelling (LA)

This course fulfills the creative arts perspective and the inquiry, imagination, and innovation theme.

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Regina Carpenter, Rothschild Pl. 107, Ext. 4-1546

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITE: None

STUDENTS: Open to all students at Ithaca College. No previous performance experience required. Students of Theatre Arts, English, School of Communications, Anthropology, Sociology, and Recreation should find the course of particular interest.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course on storytelling in contemporary society. The course will provide basic training in the art and craft of storytelling and will examine and analyze storytelling in a variety of cultures, settings, and contexts. While learning at least three stories during the semester, you will also learn about yourself as a performer, and will explore your own personal, family, and cultural identity.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Combination of lecture-discussion and workshop-performance rounds.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three storytelling performances, weekly written response papers, class participation, and a written study of storytelling in everyday life.

Attributes: 3B, CA, CCCS, ESTS, FA, TIII (F, Y)

 

CMST 14000-01 Small Group Communication (LA)

This course is designated within the Ithaca College Integrative Core Curriculum with, A World of Systems theme or the Identities theme and the Social Sciences (SO) perspective. 

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Ann Byrne, JOB 213, Ext. 4-1067

ENROLLMENT: 24

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: COURSE DESCRIPTION: To acquaint students with contemporary theories of group development and dynamics. To provide a variety of group situations in which students can experience these dynamics and learn how their participation relates to small group theory. From the context of the world of soccer, students will be expected to analyze and compare systems and identities from a social science perspective.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion, small group exercises and assignments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Attendance and participation in formal group presentations, simulations and group exercises, exams, projects and class participation.

Attributes: 1, SO, SS, TIDE, TWOS (F-S, Y)

 

CMST 14900-01, 02 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication (LA)

This course fulfills the Social Sciences Perspective and the Mind, Body, Spirit Theme requirement for the ICC. 

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Heather Brecht, Rothschild 126, Ext. 4-3429

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The understanding and application of basic principles of interpersonal communication to everyday situations. Topic areas include self-concept, interpersonal perception, language, nonverbal communication, relational development and conflict management. The practical benefits of this course are to better understand one's own motives and interpersonal communication patterns.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion and exercises.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Exams, projects, papers. This is not a public speaking class. Students should expect to participate actively in class.

Attributes: 1, SO, SS, TMBS (F-S, Y)

 

CMST 20000-01 Sophomore Professional Development Seminar in Communication Studies (NLA)

1 CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR: Robert Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3930

ENROLLMENT: 15

Prerequisites: CMST 11000, CMST 12000, CMST 14000, CMST 14900, or CMST 26900. (Y)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar orients majors to the discipline of Communication Studies, as well as to the academic and professional opportunities available to them. It also provides majors with a common intellectual experience through participation in the Communication Studies Colloquium and a Sophomore Read. The seminar culminates in a reflexive essay in which students envision and plan how to maximize their academic experience.  (Y)

 

CMST 21500-01 Argumentation and Debate (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Scott Thomson, JOB 211, Ext. 4-3670

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students enrolled in this class will learn how to: formulate and analyze propositions, develop and conduct strategies for research, organize and analyze arguments, evaluate support for arguments, and prepare affirmative and negative cases. Students will also learn techniques for the presentation of arguments in formal contexts and techniques for cross examination.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion, participation in in-class arguments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text: Ziegelmueller, George and Jack Kay. Argumentation: Inquiry and Advocacy. 3rd Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1997.

Attributes: CCCS, HU, LMEL, LSCO (F, Y)

 

CMST 21900-01 Communication Studies Practicum NLA

1 CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR: Scott Thomson, JOB 211, Ext. 4-3670

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor; participation in one of the department’s co-curricular programs (such as debate or readers’ theater). Pass/fail only.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Practical experience in competitive speech on campus, in intercollegiate events, and in the community at large; debate and legislative assemblies, discussion, informative persuasive speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation, dramatic duos and readers theater.

NOTE: The instructor will designate the minimum activities required to receive credit. May only be taken pass/fail. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

Attributes: UND (F-S, Y)

CMST 29700-01 Directed Readings (LA)

1-4 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, JOB 210, Ext. 4-3670

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Three credits in communication studies; sophomore standing; approval of the communication studies faculty.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study of an extensive selection of literature, compiled by an instructor, on a topic of special interest. This literature should further student development within a relevant topic area that is not otherwise covered in an available course. Offered on demand only.

Attributes: HU, SS

 

CMST 32000-01 Communication, Conflict, Negotiation (LA)

CREDITS: 3

INSTRUCTOR: Angela Rulffes, Muller 318, Ext. 4-3542

ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITE: Three courses in the humanities and social sciences; Courtrooms and Communication, or by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is about conflict resolution through communication and, specifically, through methods established and regulated by law to manage bilateral conflict, including negotiation, mediation and arbitration. The course will move from theoretical to experiential. It will begin with the study of communication and conflict theory, and then move to contemporary and practical approaches to conflict management. From there, it will survey the legal framework underlying several established methods of conflict resolution, and then examine documented instances of conflict in various settings, such as business, community relations, labor management relations, international trade and international disputes. Throughout the course students will participate in mock exercises where they will assume roles of party participants to conflicts in these settings.

Attributes: HU, LMAL, LMEL, LSCO (S, O)

 

CMST 32100-01 ST: Oral Advocacy in Arbitration and the Courts (LA)

CREDITS: 3

INSTRUCTOR: Angela Rulffes, Muller 415, Ext. 4-3542

ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITE: CMST 12400, Courtrooms and Communication or by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an advanced communication performance course set in arbitration and other dispute resolution forums. Students will be expected to learn techniques of legal reasoning and argumentation, in conformity with procedural and evidentiary rules, and apply these techniques to oral advocacy in legal settings. The curriculum will highly engage students in observation and critique of oral advocacy from professional legal training materials; cinematic portrayals; in-class performances, and actual or mock arbitrations, trials, hearings, and oral arguments. 

Attributes: HU, LMAL, LSCO (S, E)

CMST 32500-01 African American Rhetoric from Protest to Tradition (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Christopher House, Muller 429, Ext. 4-3216

ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITIES: Junior standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the history of oratory and public addresses by African Americans and includes analysis of religious, political, and ceremonial speeches, for example. Specifically, this course examines the ways African Americans have employed rhetorical devices in navigating American society manifested in discourses of resistance, reform, and at times, revolt. The course surveys a representative sample of rhetorical artifacts, strategies and discourses that emerge from the African American experience, as well as theoretical and methodological tools for studying African American rhetoric.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/Discussion

Attributes: WGS WGS3 (S, E)

 

CMST 32900-01 American Eloquence: A History of American Rhetorical Discourse   (LA)

3 CREITS

INSTRUCTOR: Robert Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3939

ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITES: CMST 12000 and junior standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study of the masterpieces of American rhetoric, focusing on US history's most famous and most infamous speeches. This course focuses on the theoretical analysis of rhetorical texts. Students will cultivate critical thinking/analysis necessary for informed responses to rhetorical discourses (political, religious, educational). (IRR)

 

 

CMST 34600-01 Gender and Interpersonal Communication (LA)

This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Writing Intensive Theme requirement for the ICC.

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, Job 210, Ext. 4-3578

ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITES: CMST-14000, CMST-14900 or two courses in the social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Any student who has fulfilled the prerequisites.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course examines the social science research pertaining to proposed linguistic and nonverbal differences between women’s and men’s communication.  Students look critically at research conclusions and consider if patterns in the research are relevant to their interaction and perceptions of others’ interaction. Students discuss how gender-based roles reinforce the status quo with special attention to the effects of gendered language on self-identity and interpersonal interactions.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion, class activities. Students’ contract for graded assignments from a menu of possibilities offered at the beginning of the semester.

Attributes: 1, SS, WGS, WGS3, WI (F, Y)

 

CMST 39500-01 Internship: Communication Studies (NLA)

1-12 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, JOB 210, Ext. 4-3578

ENROLLMENT: 1

PREREQUISITES: Cumulative GPA of 2.30; permission of communication studies faculty. Variable credit.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Work-study project designed by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and an on-site practicing professional. The proposal must define the work to be done, the theories to be explored, and the student’s plan for submitting a written report based on his or her experience. Offered on demand only. Credits earned with this course may not be used as upper-level elective credit toward a communication studies major.

 

CMST 49500-01, 02 Internship: Communication Studies (NLA)

1-12 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, JOB 210, Ext. 4-3578

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Communication Studies (CMST) major, with a cumulative GPA of 2.30 and 3.00 in the major; permission of Communication Studies (CMST) faculty. Variable credit, up to 12 credits.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Work-study project designed by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and a cooperating practicing professional. The proposal must define the work to be done, the theories to be explored, and the student’s plan for submitting a written report based on his or her experience. Offered on demand only. No more than 6 credits may be used toward the major.

Attributes: UND

 

CMST 49500-03 Internship: Communication Studies (NLA)

1-12 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Bob Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3930

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Communication Studies (CMST) major, with a cumulative GPA of 2.30 and 3.00 in the major; permission of Communication Studies (CMST) faculty. Variable credit, up to 12 credits.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Work-study project designed by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and a cooperating practicing professional. The proposal must define the work to be done, the theories to be explored, and the student’s plan for submitting a written report based on his or her experience. Offered on demand only. No more than 6 credits may be used toward the major.

Attributes: UND

 

CMST 49800-01 Directed Research (LA)

Attributes: UND

1-4 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Bob Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3930

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Communication Studies (CMST) major or minor, with a cumulative GPA of 2.30 and 3.00 in the major; junior standing; permission of Communication Studies (CMST) faculty. 1-4 credits.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Research project arranged at student request an individual instructor in Communication Studies (CMST). Offered on demand only. No more than 3 credits may be used toward the major.

Attributes: UND

 

Sports Studies Courses

 

SPST 29500-01 Social Aspects of Sport (LA)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTTOR: Stephen Mosher, JOB 212, Ext. 4-3162

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITIES: Sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: An investigation of the social significance of sport and the utilization of the sociological perspective for understanding the nature of sport.

Attributes: 1, SS (F-S, Y)

 

SPST 39400-01 Sport in Film & Literature (LA)

CREDITS: 3

INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Mosher, JOB 212, Ext. 4-3162

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Junior standing; SPMM 29700, Sport Studies major or minor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Investigation of the sociocultural and mythic dimensions of contemporary sport as represented in selected films and fiction.  (S, Y).

 

SPST 39901-01 ST: Title IX & Sport (LA) – Hybrid Lecture/Online Format

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Ellen Staurowsky

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Junior standing and CMST 12400 or any LGST or WGST course or any level two SPST course.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Described as the “little statute that could”, Title IX, a federal civil rights law that bars sex discrimination in U.S. schools, provides an ideal framework to examine historical forces that influence the way we think about sport, who gets to play, what sports athletes get to play and under what circumstances, and how those sports are supported.  In this course, we travel through time, looking first at the historical roots of sport systems in the United States, grounded in Victorian ideals of masculinity and femininity.  We then proceed on to learn about what Title IX as it applies to athletics requires (and what it does not require) and intersections between Title IX and other civil rights laws (Title VI, Title VII, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act).  And finally, we spend time considering ongoing debates and controversies.  Among the topics to be covered in the class:  Title IX enforcement and audits; equitable treatment and allocation of resources under Title IX; hazing/bullying; sexual harassment/sexual assault; pregnancy and parenthood; equitable access and treatment for athletes with disabilities; LGBTQ athletes; Title IX issues arising out of the e-sports space; Title IX’s prohibition against retaliation; and other issues. This course may be repeated for a total of six credits for different selected topics. (IRR)