Fall 2015

Required Courses:

HIST 22700-01 Islamic Civilizations: Muhammad to the 19TH Century: Early Islam HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences and sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course deals with the worldwide development of Islamic societies, beginning in the Arabian Peninsula just before the time of Muhammad. The course then considers the rise and consolidation of Islam in Arabia, and follows the global development and impact of Islamic societies as they become established from Europe to Indian and Southeast Asia. The course examines Islam in its various religious, cultural and political forms, and the ways in which it has provided aspects of a stable identity for Muslims worldwide while adapting itself to the social and cultural needs of the areas to which is spread. The course will also look critically at “historiography,” or the writing of history, as we try to understand how Muslim writers construed the form and meaning of their faith and their place as Muslims within this world. The course ends as the European colonial powers encounter the Middle Eastern and Asian Islamic worlds and a series of transformations begin that result in the contours of Islam in the modern world. Counts toward “the global history” requirement for our majors.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussion of readings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, midterm and final; grading is based on performance on each of the above requirements.

History/Culture/Politics:

ARAB 10100-01 & 02 Elementary Arabic I HU
4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Faten Houissa, Rothschild 104, 4-3056 ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to students with no previous knowledge of Arabic.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The focus of the course will be developing all four skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing. It starts with spoken Levantine Arabic that is designed to develop the linguist skills and gives a good command of basic grammatical constructions and common expressions used in daily life, then gradually integrates Modern Standard Arabic in the form of listening and reading texts. Emphasis is on learning the language through it in meaningful contexts. An important objective of the course is to familiarize students with basic facts about the geography, history, and culture of the Arab world.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class meets Monday through Friday. There will be listening selections, videos, dialogues, role-playing activities, songs, poems, grammar explanations and drills.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Assignments: students should be prepared on a daily basis for participation in class discussions and for the maximization of the understanding and absorption of new materials. Attendance: Regular attendance is expected, as it is necessary to students’ progress and to maintain a constructive environment for group learning. Grades are based on attendance, class participation, quizzes, homework assignments, and tests.

ARAB 20100-01 Intermediate Arabic I HU
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Faten Houissa, Rothschild 104, 4-3056 ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: ARAB 10100 and ARAB 10200 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Expands on language skills mastered in ARAB 10100 and ARAB 10200. Reviews both basic and complex grammatical and pronunciation patterns, and provides intensive vocabulary expansion through a variety of readings, as well as conversation and writing practice. Increased attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and grammatical accuracy, but the main focus is on the developing communication skills. An appreciation of Arabic literature and culture is sought through the use of authentic materials.

STUDENTS: Open to students who completed ARAB 10100 and ARAB 10200 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class meets four days a week (MWF with the faculty member; Tuesday with a student assistant). There will be listening selections, videos, dialogues, role-playing activities, songs, poems, grammar explanations and drills.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Assignments: students should be prepared on a daily basis for participation in class discussions and for the maximization of the understanding and absorption of new materials. Attendance: regular attendance is expected, as it is necessary to students’ progress and to maintain a constructive environment for group learning. Grades are based on attendance, class participation, quizzes, homework assignments, tests, and presentations.

RLST 20500-01 Islam 1 G H DV HM HU LA TIDE TMBS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Menning, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, nmenning@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing or above.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the origins, historical development, major institutions, and central beliefs and practices of Islamic tradition. Particular attention is given to contemporary debates in Islamic Studies that shape our understanding of Islam and to Islamic responses to modern challenges of pluralism, feminism, and violence. [Check with instructor about status of paperwork to add ICC Diversity attribute to this course for Fall 2015.]

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion-oriented, with short lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Letter grade based on exams, written assignments, and class participation.

Comparative and International Study:

ANTH 37800-01 ANTHROPOLOGY OF MUSIC LA SS 3b, g

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Denise Nuttall, Gannett G124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and two courses in the social sciences.

STUDENTS: This course is designed for anyone interested in anthropology, music, and the relationships between the arts and society.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and explores how music creates and reflects culture and society. Through a variety of case studies, which may include South Asian, African, and North American music, students will explore ethnomusicological theories and techniques and will gain an appreciation for a wide range of musical styles. A few of the issues addressed in the course will include: varied musical aesthetics, relationships between musical and social structures, the relationships between music and culture, music and power, music and religion, transnational and transcultural musics, and music in global contexts.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The class will include lectures, guest lecturers and performers, discussions, listening sessions, and some music participation (though no musical experience is required or expected).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation in discussions, completion of reading and listening assignments and exams.

RLST 10600-01-02 Introduction to World Religions: Western and Modern 1 G H HU LA

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Staff, Rothschild Place 140, Ext. 41378

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the historical development of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including the challenges posed by modernity and postmodernity.

JWST/RLST 225 Expressions of Jewish Art and Architecture in Muslim Lands TR 2:35 Cynthia Hogan