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Learning/Thinking/Being Human

Learning/Thinking/Being Human

Reflections on the meaning of the humanities from IC faculty, students, and alumni.

Posted by Sarah Browne at 2:16PM   |  1 comment

The first time I studied abroad in Spain, I was sixteen and starting my senior year of high school.  I did a semester long program through a non-profit organization called Youth For Understanding (YFU), which aims for its students to be fully immersed in the language and culture of their host country.  To be honest, at the time, I did not totally know what I was getting myself...

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Posted by Michael Smith at 1:00PM   |  Add a comment

For the past several years I have been guiding students in my North American Environmental History course through a local environmental history project.  In many ways, the project has inadvertently become a kind of antidote to the ubiquity of the digital age.

The students work with one-of-a-kind archival materials at The History Center...

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Posted by Dan Breen at 9:52AM   |  1 comment

One common assumption about the overall value of humanities disciplines is that they help us to evolve as thinkers by teaching the practice of “critical thinking.”  The term, however, has become so ubiquitous that it’s actually quite difficult to get a sense of what people are attempting to convey when they use it, and why they link the term so insistently to the...

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Posted by Christina DiCillo at 9:41AM   |  Add a comment
If anyone had told me freshman year that my roommate would convince me to move to a country that’s still technically at war, I would have probably laughed.  At that point in my life, I hadn’t even been outside of North America. My experience abroad was a handful of trips across the Canadian border to get poutine and better views of Niagara Falls… Who would have...

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Posted by Fae Dremock at 10:08AM   |  2 comments

Long ago, I stopped explaining why I entered environmental humanities—why in effect I volunteered to be a tick on the hairy side of the science, diverting students from their labs and collection of field data into talking about social inequities, cultural identities, economic sacrifice zones, and discussions of, well, just what exactly is nature?

Admittedly, this is...

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