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FALL 2021 COURSE SUPPLEMENTS FOR CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY 

CSCR 10600-01 Introduction to African Diaspora Studies 1 DV G LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: M. Nicole Horsley, Egbert Hall 345, 
mhorsley@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

CSCR 10900-01 Introduction to Native American Indigenous Studies DV LA SO SS TIDE TPJ
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón, Egbert Hall 344, Ext. 41042, 
glicon@ithaca.edu
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers an interdisciplinary survey and introduction to the field of Native American Studies. Focuses on how past and present Native American experiences both in the United States and with its colonial precursors have shaped this pan-ethnic group’s identity, cultures, political power, and ways of life. Examines approaches to Native American Studies and the way Native Americans have navigated their relationship to others historically and today.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 11000-01 Introduction to Asian American Studies DV HM LA SO SS TIDE TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kai Wen Yang, kyang@ithaca.edu
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 12100-01 U.S. Civil Rights Seminar
INSTRUCTOR: Yasin Ahmed, yahmed@ithaca.edu

CSCR 12300-01 Introduction to Culture, Race & Ethnicity Concepts DV H LA LMSP LSCO SO SS TIDE TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez, Egbert Hall 347, Ext. 43921, 
bgonzalez@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies.  Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions, and aesthetics, and resistance movements.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

CSCR 20700-01 Hip-Hop Feminism: That's a Bad B@tch LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:
M. Nicole Horsley, Egbert Hall 345, 
mhorsley@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Interrogate the development and growing perspective of Hip-Hop Feminism.  The term Hip-Hop Feminism was coined by Joan Morgan with the release of “When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: A Hip-Hop Feminist Breaks it Down” (1999).  Hip-Hop Feminism emerges as a site of empowerment for women belonging to the Hip-Hop generation.  Providing a space to bring together feminist consciousness and Hip-Hop sensibilities to challenge patriarchy and racism while allowing women to re-imagine a self-politic of love and empowerment through Hip-Hop culture and music.  We will read works by Black women writers and Hip-Hop female performers to explore their cultural and knowledge production as acts of resistance, liberation, and pleasure.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 22100-01 Social Justice Seminar
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell, seversley@ithaca.edu

CSCR 22200-01 Japanese Americans and Mass Incarceration AACI DV LA TIDE TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:
Kai Wen Yang, kyang@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing and above.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will resituate Japanese American incarceration and contemporary mass incarceration by thinking about them comparatively, paying close attention to the temporal and spatial differences. The purpose of this course is to critically think about how technologies and logics of carcerality operate to punish and/or rehabilitate racialized and sexualized deviancy at different historical moments.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:

CSCR 26100-01 Watching Race in American Media AACH, ADCH, DV, HM, LA LSCH, MAP, NACH, TIDE, TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide, Egbert Hall 342, Ext. 45789, 
pioanide@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how representations of racial and ethnic identities in U.S. film, television, and music influence the construction of political, racial, and gender identities nationally. Investigates how cultural representations of race, ethnicity, and gender are central to the development of U.S. mass culture and consumerism, nationalism, citizenship, and social movements. Particular attention is given to the role of black and Latino/a culture and music in developing strategies of resistance to oppression.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

CSCR/SOCI 30500-01 Practicum in Social Change I: Urban Mentorship Initiative AAPP NLA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón, Egbert Hall 344, Ext. 41042, 
glicon@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Practicum in Social Change I: Urban Mentorship Initiative is an academic mentorship program that offers students the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary, coursework and field-based service-learning aimed at supporting urban youth’s pursuit of higher education. This is a cross-listed course; students cannot receive credit for both SOCI 30500 and CSCR 30500.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar.

CSCR 35100-01 Race and Sexual Politics AAPL ADPL DV LA LSPL NAPL SS WGS WGS3
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:
Paula Ioanide, Egbert Hall 342, Ext. 45789, pioanide@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how dominant representations of racialized sexuality, femininity, and masculinity in U.S. culture and politics influence systems of inequality. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between constructions of race and sexual politics, social policy shifts in welfare reform, the prison industrial complex, and intimate justice. Focus on antiracist feminist resistance and reproductive justice.