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Fall 2022 Course Supplement

ALL CSCRE MINORS & RPR MAJORS FALL 2022 COURSE LISTS

FALL 2022 COURSE SUPPLEMENTS
FOR CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY 

CSCR 10600-01 Introduction to African Diaspora Studies 1 DV G LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: M. Nicole Horsley, Job Hall 204, mhorsley@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture.

CSCR 10700-01 and -02 Introduction to Latino/a/x Studies DV H HU LA LAEL LAGC
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Pamela Sertzen, Job Hall 206, psertzen@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary course explores the varied experiences of Latinos/as in the United States, past and present.  Drawing from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, women’s studies, and ethnic studies, it examines the historical roots of Latino/a, Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Central, and South American peoples.  In particular, it will focus on notions of family, gender, class, race, political economy, language, and sexual identity in relation to public policy and Latino/as’ struggles for place and power.  Its approach is historical and comparative, and it emphasizes the multiplicity of Latino/a experiences as well as the strategic deployment of the term Latino/a.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.

CSCR 11000-01 Introduction to Asian American Studies DV HM LA SO SS TIDE TPJ
3 credits

ENROLLMENT:  30
INSTRUCTOR: Mika Kennedy, Job Hall 207, mkennedy3@ithaca.edu
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 12100-01 U.S. Civil Rights Seminar DV, LA
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell, Phillips Hall 194Q, seversley@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT:  30

PREREQUISITES:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  The MLK Sophomore Seminar – Researching Social Justice Seminar – introduces students to research methods by highlighting historical and contemporary social justice research. The seminar is designed to prepare students to create their own social justice-oriented research proposals connected to their social justice service.  Most specifically, the Sophomore Experience addresses the fourth student-learning outcome.  MLK Scholars Student Learning Outcomes:

· be able to utilize Dr. King’s teachings to explain and analyze the fundamental ideas associated with social justice issues.

· be able to conduct a comparative research project on a social justice issue from an international perspective.

· demonstrate competent research skills, writing skills, and presentation skills.

· be able to identify and explain the differences between community service and social justice service.

· demonstrate an understanding of race in relationship to other forms of oppression.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 12300-01 Introduction to Culture, Race & Ethnicity Concepts DV H LA LMSP LSCO SO SS TIDE TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez, Job Hall 203, Ext. 4-3921, bgonzalez@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies.  Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions, and aesthetics, and resistance movements.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.

CSCR 22200-01 Japanese Americans and Mass Incarceration AACI DV LA TIDE TPJ
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Mika Kennedy, Job Hall 207, mkennedy3@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing and above.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will resituate Japanese American incarceration and contemporary mass incarceration by thinking about them relationally.  How does the narrative of the incarceration shift when we think about it as a settler colonial and transnational history?  Taking on a social justice framework, how can we make generative connections between Japanese American incarceration and contemporary border justice?  Carceral justice?  Reparations for slavery?
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 22400-01 Race, Place, and Power AASE, LA, NASE, RPRE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Mika Kennedy, Job Hall 207, mkennedy3@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing and above.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Explores how relationships to place and environment shape and are shaped by race, power, and resistance with a focus on sites of U.S. occupation in the Pacific, such as Hawaii; Guam; Okinawa; and the Philippines. Investigates the relationship between tourism, militarization, and colonization, with a special focus on ways that contemporary scholars, artists, and writers seek to decolonize the Pacific Islands and assert Indigenous sovereignty over the Pacific's lands, cultures, and futures.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 23700-01 Policing the Borderlands: Power, Policy, and Justice DV, LA LAEL, LAGC, LMEL, LSCO, LSPP, NAPP
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Pamela Sertzen, Job Hall 206, psertzen@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Examines the history of the US-Mexico Borderlands, with a special focus on power, policy, and justice.  Investigates how state policy from the colonial period to the present has shaped people’s sense of community and national identification, and how peoples of multiple cultures and shifting national affiliations have historically negotiated power, policy, and justice in this region.  Considers how power and justice are manifested in state policy and contested through acts of resistance and violence.  Topics explored include policies associated to citizenship, statehood, immigration, sovereignty, education, crime and enforcement.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 26200-01 Black Sexualities HU AD Min LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: M. Nicole Horsley, Job Hall 204, mhorsley@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores diaspora perspective and concepts of blackness and its relationship to Black sexual economies.  Students will interrogate the historical sexualization of Black (un)gendered bodies throughout the diaspora.  Topics include, but not limited to, colonialism, sexual difference, Black eroticism, pleasure activism, sexual health and wellness, and sexual liberation.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion
 

CSCR 32400-01 Critical Race Theories in the United States AAPP, ADPP, LA, LSPP, NAPP
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: M. Nicole Horsley, Job Hall 204, mhorsley@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Explores the realities and consequences of using race as a category of analysis and identity in the United States as well as the foundations and assumptions of critical race theory.  Includes the study of racism, history of racial formations, racial identities, social constructs, the black-white binary, whiteness, and critical race theory.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture

CSCR 43300-01 Education, Oppression, and Liberation GE ADPL, ADSE, G, LA, SS

3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell, Phillips Hall 194Q, seversley@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT:  15

PREREQUISITES:  Either 3 courses in the liberal arts or permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Interrogates the educational experiences of oppressed people in the African Diaspora. A historical overview of the schools, pedagogies, and curriculums developed for Black/Brown students including the political, social, economic, and cultural manifestations of "Black education." Additionally, the course examines how educational institutions have been, and can be, used for individual, group, and global liberation.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture