Title

Electric Field Simulator

Electric Field Simulator

The objective of this simulation is to improve students' conceptual understanding of how electric fields are impacted by a configuration of charges by creating a dynamic representation of the electric field lines, field vectors, equipotential lines, and the voltage created by the charges on screen. After creating a charge distribution, the simulation visualizes the motion of test charges through the electric field. 

This simulation was built in JavaScript and so it should run on most browsers on a computer or mobile device.

Developed by Ted Mburu, Class of 2023,
Assessed by Liana Rodelli, Class of 2020,

with the guidance of Dr. Colleen Countryman, Dr. John Barr, Dr. Doug Turnbull, Ithaca College Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ithaca College Department of Computer Science, the Ithaca College Informational Technologies, the p5.js project, and Daniel Shiffman (The Coding Train).

The work has been presented at two national conferences: the Summer 2020 American Association of Physics Teachers Meeting and the 2020 National Society of Black Physicists Conference.

Electric Field Game (In Development)

The core physics principles of the simulation have also been used as the foundation of the mechanics of an educational game, still in development. Our aim in the gamification of the simulation is to improve motivation and engagement in the material. 

This game was built in JavaScript and so it should run on most browsers on a computer or mobile device.

Developed by Ted Mburu, Class of 2023,
Assessed by Liana Rodelli, Class of 2020,

with the guidance of Dr. Colleen Countryman, Dr. John Barr, Dr. Doug Turnbull, Ithaca College Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ithaca College Department of Computer Science, the Ithaca College Informational Technologies, the p5.js project, and Daniel Shiffman (The Coding Train).

Supplementary Instructional Videos (In Development)

Instructional videos (like those from Khan Academy) have been shown to increase student achievement and motivation. We use cognitive theory of multimedia learning to inform the creation of the videos and develop a means of assessing their effectiveness in our courses.

Videos produced by Ted Mburu, Class of 2023, and Chris Weil, Class of 2022.
Video analytics assessed by Raymond Rogers, Class of 2021.